Global travel warning issued by US following terror attacks in France, Canada and Australia

first_img Show Comments ▼ whatsapp Share Saturday 10 January 2015 8:27 am Global travel warning issued by US following terror attacks in France, Canada and Australia center_img whatsapp Sarah Spickernell The US department of state has issued a global travel warning, following a spate of terror attacks in Canada, Australia and most recently France.  In a statement posted online, it said that the recent attacks served as a reminder to “maintain a high level of vigilance” and “take apropriate steps to increase security awareness.  It added that it remains “concerned about the continued threat of terrorist attacks, demonstrations, and other violent actions against US citizens and interests overseas”.  In particular it noted the “high degree of sophistication and advance weapons handling” employed by the terrorists, and said their confidence was indicative of prior training.  On Wednesday, two brothers named Saif and Cherif Kouachi launched an attack on the offices of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris, in which 12 people were killed. This was followed by an attack by on a kosher supermarket in the French capital.The attacker killed four hostages and said his motive was to “target Jews”.  Last month, hostages were held at a cafe in Sydney, Australia, and in October a soldier was killed near Canada’s parliament.  Areas listed as potentially dangerous include Europe, the Middle East, Africa, south Asia and Central Asia. The warning also cites the US-led intervention against the Islamic State (IS) in Syria and Iraq as a cause of possible retaliation. Tags: NULLlast_img read more

Rutland, Chiltern, Uttlesford and South Northamptonshire named as the UK’s best rural places to live

first_imgCity workers looking for a country escape may want to try Rutland, which Halifax has today named as the best area in the UK for rural quality of life.“Rutland has moved up 11 places to the top spot in the 2015 Halifax Rural Areas Quality of Life Survey. Taking a wide range of economic and social factors into account residents here can now lay claim to having the highest standard of living in rural Britain,” said Craig McKinlay, mortgages director, Halifax.  whatsapp More From Our Partners Inside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.org The country’s smallest county boasts one of the lowest crime rates in the country and less rainfall per year than the national average. Share Express KCS Monday 30 March 2015 4:18 am Rutland, Chiltern, Uttlesford and South Northamptonshire named as the UK’s best rural places to live center_img Maldon in Essex has the lowest average annual rainfall at 561mm, below the UK average of 878.8mm, but fails to make the top 50 of rural escapes. Taking the train from Rutland’s county town of Oakham can get a commuter to St Pancras in around an hour and a half.If that journey is too long, Chiltern finishes in second place. Residents in Chiltern have the highest gross weekly earnings of anywhere in the UK at £941. Chiltern is tied with Uttlesford in Essex and Rutland for the largest average houses. Other nearby areas in the top 20 are Waverly, Mid-Sussex, South Oxfordshire, West Oxfordshire, Aylesbury Vale, and Wealden. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailzenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekComedyAbandoned Submarines Floating Around the WorldComedyForbesThese 10 Colleges Have Produced The Most Billionaire AlumniForbesEquity MirrorThey Drained Niagara Falls — They Weren’t Prepared For This Sickening DiscoveryEquity MirrorNoteableyKirstie Alley Is So Skinny Now And Looks Like A BarbieNoteableyBridesBlushThis Is Why The Royal Family Kept Quiet About Prince Harry’s Sister BridesBlushOpulent ExpressHer Quadruplets Were Born Without A Hitch. Then Doctors Realized SomethingOpulent Express whatsapp Show Comments ▼ Tags: Trading Archivelast_img read more

Pharmalittle: AbbVie will buy Allergan for $63 billion; Trump administration eyes candidates to run FDA

first_imgPharmalot About the Author Reprints By Ed Silverman June 25, 2019 Reprints Pharmalittle: AbbVie will buy Allergan for $63 billion; Trump administration eyes candidates to run FDA Ed Silverman Hello, everyone, and how are you this morning? We are doing just fine, thank you, despite a steady downpour that making the Pharmalot campus grounds particularly soggy. Nonetheless, our spirits are sunny. Once again, we will offer a gentle reminder from the Morning Mayor: Every brand new day should be unwrapped like a precious gift. So after you tug on the ribbon, you can peruse a few items of interest we have assembled for you. Hope you have a smashing day …AbbVie (ABBV) will pay $63 billion to buy Allergan (AGN), the latest megamerger between two pharma giants seeking new ways to grow, STAT reports. For AbbVie, the acquisition may ease investor concerns about long-term growth, since patents expire in a few years on its franchise product, the Humira rheumatoid arthritis treatment. Allergan sells a portfolio of aesthetic drugs, notably Botox, a $3.6 billion seller, but has struggled with pressure from investor over its own growth plans amid a failed move to extend patent life for an eye treatment. [email protected] Alex Hogan/STAT Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Log In | Learn More center_img Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What’s included? Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Tags dementiagovernment agenciesopioidspharmaceuticalspharmalittleSTAT+ @Pharmalot What is it?last_img read more

IOSCO delays new margin requirements for derivatives

first_img Keywords Over-the-counter securities and derivativesCompanies International Organization of Securities Commissions CSA seeks changes to derivatives rules Regulators have decided to delay the beginning of the phase-in period for collecting and posting initial margin on non-centrally cleared trades from December 2015 to September 2016. And, the full phase-in schedule has also been adjusted to reflect this nine-month delay, they note. The delay reflects the complexity of implementing the framework, the Basel Committee and IOSCO say. And, they indicate that they will monitor the progress of implementation to ensure that the requirements are adopted consistently across products, jurisdictions and market participants. This includes monitoring domestic rule-making as well as considering guidance on the validation and backtesting of models for margining, they note. The regulators also say that they plan to work with industry as market participants develop the models that will be required to comply with the margin requirements. “This engagement will help ensure that emerging quantitative initial margin models are consistent with the framework,” they note; but they do not intend to explicitly review, or approve, any initial margin model. Related news CSA delays margin requirements for OTC derivatives James Langton center_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Global policymakers are pushing back the introduction of new margin requirements for derivatives trades that are not centrally cleared. The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision and the International Organization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO) Wednesday published revisions to their framework for setting margin requirements for non-centrally cleared derivatives. As well, they announced that they are pushing back implementation until the fall of 2016. Derivatives markets grow, ESMA reports Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

National Heroes Ensured Freedom – Custos Allen

first_imgNational Heroes Ensured Freedom – Custos Allen CultureOctober 19, 2009 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Custos of Manchester, the Hon. Dr. Gilbert Allen, has emphasised that the freedom enjoyed by Jamaicans today, was ensured by the efforts of the National Heroes.“Every people have their Heritage, their heroes and heroines…We celebrate the memory of our National Heroes who paid the supreme price by laying down their lives for the cause of justice and freedom,” Dr. Allen said, while addressing a Heritage Service, held on October 18, at the Ridgemount United Church, in Mandeville, Manchester.“We boast heroes and heroines, past and present in all aspects of human endeavours and enterprise. We have a heritage of excellence in accomplishments, a superb performance in athletics and sports, in music, science and the arts, and in other cultural and humanitarian outreach programmes. We have accomplished much, and have much to give thanks for. The principles of hard work, good manners and hospitality has undergirded our successes,” he added.In her address, Councillor for the Johns Hall Division, Mrs Faith Sampson-Nickle, who represented the Mayor of Mandeville, Councillor Brenda Ramsay, called on citizens to stand against crime in their communities, and “give thanks for persons who stood for the cause of justice in our land.”“As we recall with gratitude their actions, we are being challenged to examine if we are following their examples to stand up for what is good and right,” she said. RelatedNational Heroes Ensured Freedom – Custos Allen Advertisementscenter_img RelatedNational Heroes Ensured Freedom – Custos Allen RelatedNational Heroes Ensured Freedom – Custos Allenlast_img read more

Decriminalisation of TV licence evasion consultation response

first_imgDecriminalisation of TV licence evasion consultation response The consultation invited views on whether the government should proceed with the decriminalisation of TV licence evasion by replacing the criminal sanction with an alternative civil enforcement scheme. It set out four criteria against which the issue of decriminalisation would be considered:whether an alternative enforcement scheme is fairer and more proportionate;the cost and difficulty to implement any alternative scheme;the potential impact on licence fee payers, particularly the most vulnerable and those with protected characteristics; andthe overall impact on licence fee collection.The consultation closed on 1 April 2020 after receiving 154,737 responses from individuals, campaign organisations and other stakeholders. A summary of the responses is included in today’s publication.After carefully considering the responses received, the government remains concerned that a criminal sanction for TV licence evasion is increasingly disproportionate and unfair in a modern public service broadcasting system. The consultation responses showed that a significant number of people oppose the criminal sanction with some highlighting the considerable stress and anxiety it can cause for individuals, including for the most vulnerable in society, such as older people.However, the government recognises that changing the sanction for TV licence evasion would have wide-ranging impacts for licence fee payers, including the potential for significantly higher fines and costs for individuals who evade the licence fee requirement under a civil regime. The consultation also highlighted significant impacts in terms of both the cost and implementation – particularly as the current system is very efficiently handled in the Magistrates Court – and challenges posed to the ongoing collection of the licence fee. The government remains determined that any future change to the TV licence sanction or enforcement scheme should not be seen as an invitation to evade the TV licence requirement, nor should it privilege the rule-breaking minority over the rule-abiding majority.The government’s consultation response, which we publish today, therefore sets out that the issue of decriminalisation will remain under active consideration while more work is undertaken to understand the impact of alternative enforcement schemes.In particular, a future decision on decriminalising TV licence evasion would benefit from consideration in the context of wider reform to the BBC. The Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport has a roadmap for reform of the BBC and this provides critical context for any future decision on decriminalisation.The government will therefore take forward these considerations in the broader context of the next licence fee settlement, which will set the level of the Licence Fee for a period of at least five years from 2022, and where negotiations have recently formally begun. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:anxiety, campaign, Criminal, culture, digital, Government, Impact, licence, magistrates court, older people, reform, Secretary, secretary of state, settlement, Society, stress, UK, UK Governmentlast_img read more

Recruitment of 5 new members for Regulatory Policy Committee

first_imgRecruitment of 5 new members for Regulatory Policy Committee The Regulatory Policy Committee (RPC) is an advisory non-departmental public body of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS). The RPC provides independent, expert advice on the quality of analysis and evidence used by departments and regulators in their assessments of the economic impact on business from regulatory interventions.  The RPC works to improve the transparency and accuracy of measurement of the impacts of regulation. It is an important part of the better regulation system, providing stakeholders with confidence that the costs and benefits from regulatory change have been properly considered.  We are looking for people that have the ability to bring an external and independent perspective, providing constructive challenge and scrutiny, to the quality of analysis and evidence underpinning regulatory proposals. We are looking for up to 5 new members with skills in economics, law, accountancy and experience of a business subject to regulation. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:business, energy, Government, Impact, industrial, law, quality, regulation, UK, UK Governmentlast_img read more

Incident at UMC

first_imgThe CU Police Department has reported that there was a stabbing incident at the University Memorial Center at approximately 9:45 a.m. today.The suspect has been taken into custody. The victim has been taken to the hospital and appears to be stable. CU officials have been in communication with the family of the student victim. The south side of the UMC has been secured, the suspect’s car is being searched and the police are continuing their investigation.All faculty, staff, students and visitors are asked to avoid the UMC area for the next several hours to facilitate the investigation. For updates, check www.colorado.edu. Published: Aug. 25, 2007 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

Gulf oil spill similar to Exxon Valdez in initial social and mental impacts, study finds

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail A hand-painted sign in the front yard of a home in Bayou La Batre, Ala., captures the concerns of many area residents about the contamination of the Gulf of Mexico by the 2010 oil spill and dispersants used in the cleanup. (Photo courtesy Liesel Ritchie) The BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill caused social disruption and psychological stress among Gulf residents that is similar to the aftermath of the Exxon Valdez spill and the impacts are likely to persist for years, a new study finds.”Just ask the residents of Cordova today whether they are over the Exxon Valdez,” said study co-author Liesel Ritchie, assistant director for research of the University of Colorado Boulder’s Natural Hazards Center. The Alaska community was considered “ground zero” for the 1989 oil spill.The research was a collaborative effort among Ritchie, Duane Gill of Oklahoma State University and J. Steven Picou of the University of South Alabama, each of whom did similar work in Cordova. Major funding was provided by the National Science Foundation and the study’s results have been accepted for publication in two peer-reviewed journals.The study focused on the residents of south Mobile County, Ala. The area along the Gulf includes the towns of Bayou la Batre and Dauphin Island, and numerous unincorporated communities.Using a random telephone survey modeled after previous work on the Exxon Valdez spill, the University of South Alabama Polling Group in September 2010 received responses from 412 residents or 46 percent of those contacted. All responders were age 18 or older and had lived in the area for at least a year.Major findings of the survey included the following:–Event-related psychological stress among residents of south Mobile County, five months after the BP oil spill, was similar to that of residents of Cordova five months after the Exxon Valdez.–If the trends observed in Cordova hold true for Alabama, significant spill-related psychological stress can be expected to continue in south Mobile County over the next decade.–One-fifth of south Mobile County respondents were in the severe stress category and another one-fourth were in the moderate range. The finding was similar to the sample from Cordova in which more than one-half were classified as either severe or moderate.–Higher levels of event-related psychological stress among south Mobile County residents were consistently related to family health concerns, economic loss, concern for future economic loss, ties to ecosystem resources and exposure to oil.–Four out of 10 respondents (43 percent) reported a commercial connection to coastal resources, and those with connections to damaged/threatened resources were more likely to experience higher levels of stress.–People in lower income categories and lower levels of education were more likely to experience high levels of stress.–Approximately one out of three respondents experienced some type of exposure to oil, and such exposure was significantly related to higher levels of stress.–Sixty-six percent of respondents reported negative spill-related economic impacts on their households.–Fifty-six percent of respondents indicated concern about the threat of economic loss.People with commercial ties to damaged natural resources suffered the greatest impacts, the authors found.”Given the social scientific evidence amassed over the years in Prince William Sound, Alaska, we can only conclude that social disruption and psychological stress will characterize residents of Gulf Coast communities for decades to come,” the authors wrote.Like the Exxon Valdez, and technological disasters in general, the aftermath of the BP oil spill will include “contested” scientific evidence concerning ecological damages, secondary traumas resulting from the claims process and litigation, and serious community conflict and mental health problems, the authors wrote.The study’s results will be published in forthcoming editions of the journals American Behavioral Scientist and Contexts.The Natural Hazards Center is part of CU-Boulder’s Institute of Behavioral Science. For more information about the center visit www.colorado.edu/hazards. A comparison of event-related psychological distress among residents of south Mobile County, Ala., in 2010, and Cordova, Alaska, in 1989. (Chart courtesy of Liesel Ritchie, Duane Gill and J. Steven Picou)center_img Categories:AcademicsScience & TechnologyEnvironmentCampus CommunityNews Headlines Published: April 19, 2011 last_img read more

College of Music marks 100th anniversary with $50 million music+ campaign

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Feb. 13, 2017 • By Jessie Bauters Learn about the campaign for the College of Music music+ Grace Burns performs during the College of Music showcase concert at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall.No one knows better than Grace Burns just what a difference a vision and a financial boost can mean to a young musician and college student.Burns was one of 14 students from the University of Colorado Boulder College of Music to perform in a showcase concert at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall in November.“It was an amazing experience to look out from the stage and see my family, professors, college alumni—in a packed hall,” said Burns, who is a piano master’s student. “I’m so grateful for the opportunity.”In support of opportunities like this, and in celebration of its approaching centennial in 2020, the college is embarking on its first major fundraising campaign.The “music+” campaign is tied to a dynamic new outlook for music at CU Boulder called “The College of Music Advantage.” The wide-reaching, 10-year strategic plan was set in motion by the priorities of students, faculty, staff and other members of the college community. It emphasizes cross-campus partnerships, an expansion of alumni resources and services, and more professional performance opportunities like Carnegie Hall.A cornerstone of music+ is the launch of an ambitious effort to raise $50 million. Currently, the college is nearly halfway to reaching that goal, including major gifts totaling $4 million that led to the naming of the Eklund Opera Program and the Ritter Family Classical Guitar Program.“It’s encouraging to see the college take its national and international reputation to the next level,” said Chancellor Philip P. DiStefano. “Music will play a big role as the campus takes its place as a leading innovation university with a positive impact on our world.”DiStefano said the College of Music’s campaign sets an example for future collaborative fundraising efforts in other colleges, schools and programs on campus.Dean Robert Shay said the music+ campaign both reflects the aspirations of the college to strengthen its position as a leader among higher education music institutions and celebrates 100 years of musical excellence and innovation at CU Boulder.“It’s this idea that we will take our core activities, which are already terrific, and add amazing new layers of professional experiences, interdisciplinary partnerships and leadership opportunities,” Shay said.The future of music at CU BoulderThe tagline of the campaign is “The future of music, a century in the making.” While laying the groundwork for the next 100 years of music at CU Boulder, it celebrates the college’s first 100 years of achievement:The College of Music’s Graduate Quartet Program gives one established string quartet the opportunity to hone its craft alongside members of the Grammy Award-winning Takács Quartet.The CU Boulder Entrepreneurship Center for Music was the first of its kind in the country when it was founded in the 1990s.The College of Music has twice hosted the principal players of the Cleveland Orchestra for residencies.In June 2016, Eklund Opera’s new opera program, CU NOW, hosted composer Jake Heggie, librettist Gene Scheer and members of the Houston Grand Opera musical staff for a workshop of “It’s a Wonderful Life.”The College of Music is partnering with other academic units on the CU Boulder campus to offer a Bachelor of Arts degree in Music with a Media and Technology emphasis starting in Fall 2017.Students from El Sistema Colorado, which teaches music to underprivileged children in the Denver area, performed in two concerts with College of Music students in Spring 2016: Music education students Claire Glover and Cameron Coday invited an El Sistema ensemble to perform on their junior recital and El Sistema joined the CU Symphony Orchestra on stage at Boettcher Concert Hall during the college’s showcase concert in April.Becky Roser, a longtime supporter of the College of Music and namesake, along with her late husband Jim, of the Roser Visiting Artists Program and Roser ATLAS Building on the CU Boulder campus, is chairing the music+ campaign. She said the college’s bold plans for the future call for an equally bold effort to make them a reality.“What makes this different is that it’s an opportunity to build on an already successful foundation and do things in new, creative ways,” Roser said. “It’s the right timing. Things have coalesced nicely to allow for this breakthrough moment. It’s time for the college to strut its stuff.”Shay said spirit of collaboration among students, faculty, alumni and community members is a big part of what makes music+ compelling.“Everyone within our community, including students, faculty, staff and supporters, recognizes and relishes how vibrant and collaborative the environment is at the College of Music,” Shay said. “Those internal values give us confidence as we take this message outward, especially when reconnecting with alumni.”For students like Burns, the strategic vision—coupled with community support—will set the College of Music apart and lead to even more impressive outcomes for students, alumni and faculty.The piano master’s student and her peers couldn’t have made the trip to New York to perform in the iconic, career-launching Carnegie Hall without the generosity of the College of Music’s donors. The opportunity was made possible with gift funds dedicated to student travel provided by donors such as Don and Maria Johnson, Dan and Boyce Sher and Becky Roser.“It was so valuable for all of us to have that real-world experience outside of our normal comfort zone. To go from navigating New York City to dress rehearsal to successful concert in one day was a great way for us to be exposed to the life of a concert musician.”For more information on how to support and get involved in music+, visit the music+ page.Tags:AlumniFacultyGivingStudentslast_img read more