St. Elizabeth Farmers to Benefit from Rainwater Harvesting Project

first_imgRelatedSt. Elizabeth Farmers to Benefit from Rainwater Harvesting Project By Garfield L. Angus, JIS Reporter FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail A rainwater harvesting project, to benefit some 300 farmers in the bread basket parish of St. Elizabeth, was launched on March 15 by the National Irrigation Commission (NIC). The $4.5 million project, to be undertaken with support from the United Nations Global Environmental Facility (GEF), will involve resuscitation of a six million-gallon catchment tank located in the community of Lititz, for the harvesting of rainwater for irrigation purposes. The scope of work will include repairing cracks in the tank, bushing of the premises and removal of debris, erecting a security fence, installing a solar pump and conveyance system, and designing and installing a gravity drip system. Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Roger Clarke, in his remarks at the launch held at the project site, said the undertaking is significant “as it will provide a scarce resource to a resilience set of farmers”. He pointed to the need for unused catchment tanks across the island to be put into operation so that there can be an increase in rainwater harvesting. “I would want to see this project replicated throughout Jamaica, not only for irrigation purposes,” he said. The rain water harvesting project, which will be implemented by the Forestry Department, was borne out of a need to address the problem of land degradation, by introducing farmers to best practices in drip irrigation and land husbandry. It is slated for completion in June 2012. Through collaboration with the Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA), training will be provided to farmers via seminars and on-farm demonstration using the Farmer Field School methodology. The method, which involves trainers working alongside farmers as advisors and facilitators, promotes exploration, discovery and adaptation under local conditions. Minister Clarke in the meantime, urged the country’s farmers to increase production, so as to grow the economy and boost employment. “What we need in this country is production and employment. We are not going to get ourselves out by borrowing money every day,” he stated. He said that more focus must be placed on agro-processing and the valued-added aspect of the sector, noting that “the time has come when we must decide that we cannot continue to be primary producers”. “We want more of the value-added to be done here so that the farmers can get more money. It is the only way that we are going to attract young people into agriculture,” the Minister said. St. Elizabeth Farmers to Benefit from Rainwater Harvesting Project AgricultureMarch 18, 2012 RelatedSt. Elizabeth Farmers to Benefit from Rainwater Harvesting Project RelatedSt. Elizabeth Farmers to Benefit from Rainwater Harvesting Project Advertisementslast_img read more

RCom nears settlement on Ericsson debt

first_img Troubled Indian operator Reliance Communications (RCom) and Ericsson moved closer to reaching a settlement over the operator’s outstanding debt, which would allow it to exit bankruptcy proceedings and sell its wireless assets to Reliance Jio in order to pay off debt, The Economist Times (ET) reported.The two companies, after lengthy negotiations, reportedly are discussing a deal of between INR6 billion and INR7 billion ($89 million and $104 million), with Ericsson lowering the amount it needs to resolve the dispute. Ericsson earlier told the court it would need at least INR9.8 billion, despite previously claiming RCom owes it about INR16 billion, ET said.Both companies will submit their settlement offers to the National Company Law Appellate Tribunal today (30 May). A source told ET Ericsson may require a bank guarantee for payment.A settlement would allow RCom to exit debt resolution proceedings ordered in mid-May by the National Company Law Tribunal (NCLT) and move ahead with the sale of assets to Jio.Talks beginTwo weeks ago RCom said it was in talks with Ericsson to sort out a debt of $150 million outside of bankruptcy court.In mid-May the NCLT accepted Ericsson’s request for RCom to face bankruptcy proceedings over the debt, which put into jeopardy its plans to sell most of its wireless assets to Jio.RCom’s shareholders in February approved a plan to sell its wireless assets to Jio, in a move which will cut the struggling operator’s debt load by INR250 billion. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 30 MAY 2018 Previous ArticleRussia presses Apple on Telegram banNext ArticleAPT awarded first trial 5G licence in Taiwan Joseph Waring Jio profit soars on subscriber gains HomeAsiaNews RCom nears settlement on Ericsson debt 2degrees taps Ericsson for 5G RAN, core equipment Relatedcenter_img Author Ericsson-Samsung patent deal ends legal disputes Joseph Waring joins Mobile World Live as the Asia editor for its new Asia channel. Before joining the GSMA, Joseph was group editor for Telecom Asia for more than ten years. In addition to writing features, news and blogs, he… Read more Asia Tags EricssonReliance CommunicationsReliance jiolast_img read more

Intention, Agency, Even in “Simple” Life Is No Illusion

first_img TagsagencybacteriabiologyillusionintentionlifeMichael DentonneutrophilsphysiologyPurpose and DesireRobert CrowtherScott TurnerState University of New York College of Environmental SciencesThe Miracle of the Cell,Trending Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Share Photo credit: Maksim Shutov via Unsplash.What does it mean for something to be “alive”? Here is a classic episode of ID the Future that is very well timed with the release on Monday of Michael Denton’s new book, The Miracle of the Cell. In the book, Dr. Denton urges readers to watch a short video, “Neutrophil Chasing Bacteria”: “What one witnesses there seems to transcend all our intuitions: A tiny speck of matter, invisible to the naked eye, so small that one hundred of them could be lined up across the top of a pin, is seemingly endowed with intention and agency.” See it here: Intelligent Design Origin of Life: Brian Miller Distills a Debate Between Dave Farina and James Tour Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Congratulations to Science Magazine for an Honest Portrayal of Darwin’s Descent of Man Jane Goodall Meets the God Hypothesis Is the appearance of “intention and agency” on the part of seemingly simple “specks” of life an illusion or is it real? Biologist Scott Turner sat down with host Robert Crowther to discuss just that question. Download the podcast or listen to it here. Turner, a biologist and physiologist, explains that the appearance is no illusion. It’s very real, a fact from whose profound implications most scientists veil their eyes. Professor Turner teaches at the State University of New York College of Environmental Sciences and Forestry. He is the author most recently of Purpose and Desire: What Makes Something Alive and Why Modern Darwinism Has Failed To Explain It. Life Sciences Intention, Agency, Even in “Simple” Life Is No IllusionDavid KlinghofferSeptember 26, 2020, 7:23 AM “A Summary of the Evidence for Intelligent Design”: The Study Guide Requesting a (Partial) Retraction from Darrel Falk and BioLogos Recommended A Physician Describes How Behe Changed His MindLife’s Origin — A “Mystery” Made AccessibleCodes Are Not Products of PhysicsIxnay on the Ambriancay PlosionexhayDesign Triangulation: My Thanksgiving Gift to Alllast_img read more

News / IATA names Glyn Hughes its new head of cargo, as Des Vertannes bows out

first_img The affable and diplomatic Glyn Hughes has become the new global head of cargo for IATA – a move that is expected to be welcomed across the industry.The well-liked Mr Hughes has huge IATA cargo experience, having been at the organisation since 1991, when he joined to expand its Cargo Accounts Settlement Service (CASS) from an initial 35 members to well over 100. More recently, he was on the steering committee of the Global Air Cargo Advisory Council (Gacag).When asked about the job, he replied in a characteristic manner: “In the words of Jim Hacker [of UK TV comedy Yes Minister], if one is asked to serve one’s country it is his duty to oblige.”It is four years to the day that his predecessor, Des Vertannes, took up the mantle at IATA, with his own challenging brief of modernising the “antiquated” air cargo industry.The aim for Mr Hughes will be to build upon the work that he started, said Ram Menen, who today marks the first anniversary of his retirement as head of Emirates SkyCargo.“Des initiated major changes in the industry, and he’s built very strong foundations for new changes,” said Mr Menen. “Now, for IATA, it’s a question of building a superstructure on the top of the new foundations.“Before Des made the changes, that superstructure could not have been built.”A critical focus for IATA now must be to continue to equalise the relationships of the three parties involved in trading air cargo capacity under the guise of the Cargo Agency Modernisation Programme (CAMP), said Mr Menen.The programme, instigated by Mr Vertannes, initially focused on making forwarders principals in a contract, rather than agents of the airline. This relationship must now extend to shippers, argues Mr Menen.“The shippers now need to get involved and also become principals. Shippers complain about lack of transparency in the airfreight sector, but there’s nothing to stop them from buying services online – and paying for those services that they procure.”Noting that there is understandable resistance from forwarders for this to happen, he added: “Forwarders feel insecure – but airlines can’t provide the full services that shippers need, and shippers can’t either. So the forwarder is absolutely safe.”Mr Vertannes was also instrumental in improving the fairly disastrous relationship between FIATA and IATA.“In his masterful way, Des managed to bring those parties together,” said Mr Menen.Ram Menen (left) with Des Vertannes last night at his ‘leaving do’ in GenevaThe airfreight industry is often mocked because of the number of associations apparently needed to run it, but each has a different role to play. The role for IATA, the airlines’ representative, is to ensure the processes are in place for industry modernisation – and this is what the new head of cargo should focus on, say observers.Of course, the other issue for Mr Hughes is the roll-out of e-freight.Global penetration by the end of April was 14.3%. In a recent interview, Mr Vertannes acknowledged that this had been a disappointment and that he would have preferred to have seen 50% by his retirement day. But, assuming sufficient and continued impetus from IATA, e-freight is now well on its way.And Mr Vertannes leaves his successor with another challenge. At the end of IATA’s World Cargo Symposium in March, he charged the industry with cutting 48-hours off transit times.Tony Tyler, IATA’s Director General and CEO, said: “Air cargo faces considerable challenges and we have an ambitious goal to improve the industry’s competitiveness through a cut in end-to-end shipping times of up to 48 hours. Glyn and his team will be dedicated to that goal, as well as to deliver the industry priorities of safety, security, quality, modernization and transformation through the e-cargo agenda.”But, as Mr Vertannes recently noted: “IATA can only encourage behavioural change.”It appears though, that IATA cannot do so at any decent pace. Citing the governance at IATA as the biggest frustration of his time there, he said: “Everything takes so long to shape and bring to a conclusion. You need to follow strict procedures and there is a consultative process, as you need to carry all the membership along with you.“Sometimes it’s difficult when you want things to happen at great speed – and they can’t.”We at The Loadstar wish Mr Vertannes every happiness in his retirement – and wish Mr Hughes fair winds and following seas in his unenviable task of taking the next steps to modernise the airfreight industry. By Alex Lennane 06/06/2014last_img read more

News / Global fleet capacity to bulge as more containerships are delivered in 2018

first_img There will be a 5.6% growth in container fleet capacity this year, according to scheduled newbuild deliveries of 1.49m teu and expected in scrapping of some 350,000 teu, says Alphaliner.After 2017’s slight supply-demand rebalancing, the pent-up flood of newbuild deliveries this year will be a challenge for shipowners and container lines – especially if there is a dip in demand.And notwithstanding a softening of demand and seasonal fluctuations, analysts cited higher oil prices and increased protectionism as additional threats to demand growth this year and next.Alphaliner noted that orders placed in 2017 were up a massive 140% on the previous year, to 671,641 teu, and expected a “marginal increase” this year as ocean carriers renew their newbuild appetite and take advantage of discounts and incentives from embattled Asian shipyards. By Mike Wackett 03/01/2018 Indeed, some of the smaller liner players, such as Hyundai Merchant Marine (HMM) and Yang Ming, have made no secret of their intentions to place new orders on the back of improved trading in 2017.In his new year message to HMM staff yesterday, chief executive and president CK Yoo restated the South Korean carrier’s aggressive growth aspirations, including plans to order ultra-large container vessels (ULCVs).HMM would “continue to consider ways of doubling our vessel capacity by 2022 [from the current 347,000 teu] including the launching of mega containerships.“We achieved the 4m teu milestone in annual liftings in 2017, from 3m teu in 2016, as we successfully regained support from customers through our strenuous efforts to rebuild our credibility,” said Mr Yoo.According to Alphaliner data, total global container capacity at the end of 2017 stood at 5,177 vessels for 21.1m teu – up 3.7% on the previous year in terms of cellular capacity, which compares with full-year demand growth estimates of around 4% to 5%, according to Maersk Line.On 31 December, the containership orderbook stood at 345, equating to 2.67m teu, with much of this capacity concentrated in the larger vessel sectors.Cosco has ordered the most by far – 28 ships for 496,000 teu, averaging 17,700 teu per vessel – representing a massive 27.6% increase on current capacity.Meanwhile, according to data compiled by London-based shipbroker Braemar ACM, there were a total of 153 containerships scrapped last year for 437,000 teu. This compared with 658,000 teu for 182 vessels in 2016.Having been on a par with 2016 for the first six months of the year, containership owners were encouraged by unexpectedly strong demand and improving charter rates to reactivate their ships rather than consign them to the scrapyards. And Alphaliner’s idle fleet analysis finished the year showing 117 vessels in hot or cold lay-up, for some 416,000 teu, representing 2% of the global fleet.This was its lowest level since early 2015 and significantly below the 400 unemployed vessels peak of mid-2016.center_img ID 21253782 Dylonslast_img read more

Terblanche steps down as Sarla chief

first_img From the magazine: Jano Vermaak names his Perfect XVFormer Springbok, Bulls, Lions and Stormers scrumhalf Jano Vermaak names a team of the best he played alongside and against.SA Rugby MagUndoCNAHow is life for Cambodian boy linguist after viral fame?CNA|SponsoredSponsoredUndoLife Exact BrazilGrace Jones Is Now 72 Years Old, This Is Her NowLife Exact Brazil|SponsoredSponsoredUndoBuzz TreatmentRemember Grace Jones? Try Not To Smile When You See Her NowBuzz Treatment|SponsoredSponsoredUndo熱門話題不要被酵素騙了!在萬寧賣的「這個」直接針對脂肪…熱門話題|SponsoredSponsoredUndoLoans | Search AdsLooking for loan in Hong Kong? Find options hereLoans | Search Ads|SponsoredSponsoredUndo Five one-cap Boks that could still represent South AfricaSA Rugby MagUndo 熱門話題對肚腩脂肪感到後悔!試了在萬寧賣的這個後…熱門話題|SponsoredSponsoredUndo ‘ Former Springbok Stefan Terblanche will be stepping down from his role as chief executive of the SA Rugby Legends Association (Sarla) to pursue other interests.In a public statement on Wednesday, Sarla confirmed that it has had to implement operational restructuring in the wake of the financial impact of the Covid-19 pandemic.COLUMN: All Blacks’ strength is good for the game and SpringboksAs part of this restructuring, Terblanche, who has served with the association since retiring in 2012, has decided to step down from his current role as the association’s CEO.‘On behalf of the Board, the staff and SARLA’s legends, we want to thank Stefan for his valued contribution to SARLA over the past 8 years and wish him all the very best in the next chapter of his career,’ association president Gavin Varejes said.The non-profit organisation also confirmed that it has sadly had to cancel two of its biggest rugby development programmes, Vuka and Iqhawe, as funding for the two tournaments has been cut.The board of Sarla, which consists of former players and prominent South African businessmen, will oversee the organisation’s management. The regional offices in Cape Town, Durban and Johannesburg will remain open.‘Our hope is to move back to full-time rugby programmes next year, so that SARLA can continue changing lives of the kids in our disadvantaged communities that rely on our development programmes to give them hope for a better future,’ said John Smit, who serves on the Sarla board.WATCH: Jonah Lomu – Gone but not forgottenPhoto: Gallo Images Posted in News, Top headlines BuzzAura16 Cancer Causing Foods You Probably Eat Every DayBuzzAura|SponsoredSponsoredUndo Terblanche steps down as Sarla chief MoneyMorningPaperThe 10 Richest Families Of The World. Especially No. 6 Is A Complete Surprise.MoneyMorningPaper|SponsoredSponsoredUndo ‘center_img Published on November 18, 2020 Post by SA Rugby magazine ‘  238  43 ‘ Stefan Terblanche ‘ ‘ AlphaCuteOprah’s New House Cost $90 Million, And This Is What It Looks LikeAlphaCute|SponsoredSponsoredUndoWorld Cup-winning Bok quartet in Eddie Jones’ all-time XVSA Rugby MagUndoWatch: Kolbe makes Test players look amateur – Ugo MonyeSA Rugby MagUndoGoGoPeak10 Most Beautiful Cities You Should Visit Once In Your LifetimeGoGoPeak|SponsoredSponsoredUndolast_img read more

Walmart isn’t after your book of business

first_imgYou have read 32 of 3 free articles this week. Register now for increased access.Register for free access to this article.By registering, you can read up to 3 articles per week.RegisterAlready registered? Sign in to continue reading or subscribe for unlimited access.,MOST READ House panel unanimously passes SECURE 2.0 2 1 Why Tony Robbins, tax shelters and financial advisers don’t mix The Gates divorce: Lessons for financial advisers House committee poised to advance SECURE 2.0 retirement savings bill Newsletters 3 Subscribe for original insights, commentary and analysis of the issues facing the financial advice community, from the InvestmentNews team. InvestCloud to acquire Advicent and NaviPlan planning software 4 5last_img read more

North Carolina researchers improve stacked solar cell connections

first_imgNorth Carolina researchers improve stacked solar cell connectionsThe breakthrough will allow solar cell manufacturers to create stacked solar cells that can handle high-intensity solar energies without losing voltage at the connecting junctions, potentially improving conversion efficiency. September 9, 2013 pv magazine Installations Manufacturing Markets Markets & Policy Technology Technology and R&D Share Researchers from North Carolina State University have managed to improve the connections between stacked solar cells, which could improve the overall efficiency of solar energy devices and reduce the cost of solar energy production.The new connections can allow these cells to operate at solar concentrations of 70,000 suns worth of energy without losing much voltage as “wasted energy” or heat, according to the university.Stacked solar cells consist of several solar cells that are stacked on top of one another. Stacked cells are currently the most efficient cells on the market, converting up to 45% of the solar energy they absorb into electricity.To be effective, however, solar cell designers need to ensure the connecting junctions between these stacked cells do not absorb any of the solar energy and do not siphon off the voltage the cells produce – effectively wasting that energy as heat, according to the university.”We have discovered that by inserting a very thin film of gallium arsenide into the connecting junction of stacked cells we can virtually eliminate voltage loss without blocking any of the solar energy,” said Salah Bedair, a professor of electrical engineering at NC State and senior author of a paper describing the work.Popular content The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… 123456Share pv magazine The pv magazine editorial team includes specialists in equipment supply, manufacturing, policy, markets, balance of systems, and EPC.More articles from pv magazine Related content Dynamics driving insurance costs pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com While utility-scale solar assets are surging in popularity with investors, there are a number of emerging challenges tha… California to host 1 GW of compressed air storage Tim Sylvia 30 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Two projects in California will fill part of the 1,600 MW of long-duration energy storage that state regulators have said is needed by 2026. 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Lack of policy hampers energy storage in Cyprus Ilias Tsagas 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Although the government last month started offering purchase incentives for residential batteries, a net metering regime… iAbout these recommendations Elsewhere on pv magazine… MIBEL alcanzó nuevamente los precios más bajos de Europa mientras subieron en el resto de mercados eléctricos pv magazine 23 March 2021 pv-magazine.es En la tercera semana de marzo los precios de la mayoría de mercados eléctricos europeos subieron, mientras que MIBEL mar… Tasmanian Labor installs solar at the top of its campaign promises Blake Matich 8 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Tasmania (TAS) is going to the polls on May 1, and the opposition Labor Party has put forth a $20 million plan to fund l… India closing in on 7 GW of rooftop solar pv magazine 13 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com India’s cumulative installed capacity of rooftop solar stood at 6,792 MW as of December 31, 2020, with 1,352 MW having b… Spotlight on Australian solar Bella Peacock 21 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Calculating the average sunlight hours data from the Bureau of Meteorology from January toDecember 2020, Darwin was cro… Q&A: EEW’s $500 million Gladstone solar to hydrogen project is just the start Blake Matich 18 March 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com pv magazine Australia: Australia is the testing ground for a lot of different aspects of the future green hydrogen market. Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… iAbout these recommendations Leave a Reply Cancel replyPlease be mindful of our community standards.Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentName * Email * Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. By submitting this form you agree to pv magazine using your data for the purposes of publishing your comment.Your personal data will only be disclosed or otherwise transmitted to third parties for the purposes of spam filtering or if this is necessary for technical maintenance of the website. 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Select one or more editions for targeted, up to date information delivered straight to your inbox.Email* Select Edition(s)*Hold Ctrl or Cmd to select multiple editions.Tap to select multiple editions.Global (English, daily)Germany (German, daily)U.S. (English, daily)Australia (English, daily)China (Chinese, weekly)India (English, daily)Latin America (Spanish, daily)Brazil (Portuguese, weekly)Mexico (Spanish, daily)Spain (Spanish, daily)France (French, daily)We send newsletters with the approximate frequency outlined for each edition above, with occasional additional notifications about events and webinars. We measure how often our emails are opened, and which links our readers click. To provide a secure and reliable service, we send our email with MailChimp, which means we store email addresses and analytical data on their servers. You can opt out of our newsletters at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of every mail. For more information please see our Data Protection Policy. Subscribe to our global magazine SubscribeOur events and webinars Household solutions for maximizing self-consumption using smart contro… , pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsRobert van Keulen, Technical Manager, GrowattGautham Ram, Assistant Professor and Researcher, D… Reducing solar project risk for extreme weather 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsDaniel H.S. Chang, VP of Business Development | RETCGreg Beardsworth, Sr. Director of Product M… iAbout these recommendations pv magazine print Dynamics driving insurance costs pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com While utility-scale solar assets are surging in popularity with investors, there are a number of emerging challenges tha… Battery testing builds certainty pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Owners and operators of energy storage systems, as well as investors, need transparent ways to evaluate battery performance. Unchained: political moves shift solar supply David Wagman 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com PV module supply chains to the U.S. industry are in flux, and not for the first time. Moves to take action alongside sti… When quality meets quantity Jonathan Gifford 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com As 2021 progresses, the signs of it being (yet another) banner year for PV deployment become clearer. An increasing numb… The ideal format pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The speed at which manufacturers are introducing changes from one product generation to the next is accelerating – curre… Pretty stressful Cornelia Lichner 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com To find out whether a module is susceptible to potential-induced degradation, you can conduct stress tests in a climate chamber. iAbout these recommendationslast_img read more

IFC partners on two 50 MW solar projects in Zambia

first_imgIFC partners on two 50 MW solar projects in ZambiaThe member of the World Bank Group has signed an MoU with Industrial Development Corporation Zambia to develop the country’s first utility-scale solar PV projects. July 22, 2015 Ian Clover Manufacturing Markets Markets & Policy Share The International Finance Corporation (IFC) – a member of the World Bank Group – has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) Zambia to construct two 50 MW solar PV plants in Zambia. The MoU signals the two corporations’ intent to develop the African country’s first utility-scale solar parks under a program called Scaling Solar. IDC has been charged by Zambian president Edgar Chagwa Lungu to develop 600 MW of solar PV capacity in an attempt to help address the country’s ongoing power crisis. Zambia is currently suffering from a national power generation deficit of around 560 MW, a situation that has been exacerbated by low rainfall in the past year that has reduced the country’s hydropower output. President Lungu said: “The Zambian government is resolved to address the current hydropower shortages caused by low rainfall through active promotion and increased use of renewable energy technologies.” These first two projects are to be located on separate sites and developed by different private sector sponsors, but IFC’s Scaling Solar initiative is expected to seek to engage Zambian partners during the development process. The program is also seeking Zambian companies to act as partners in the ownership structure. “IFC is developing this partnership with IDC Zambia to deliver affordable renewable energy that can mitigate the country’s ongoing energy crisis,” said IFC director for eastern and southern Africa, Oumar Seydi. “The Scaling Solar program enables us to apply the full range of World Bank Group services to address Zambia’s challenges quickly and sustainably.” A formal advisory mandate will be negotiated over the next few weeks between the two corporations. Once finalized, project development will commence.Popular content The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… 123456Share Ian Clover Ian joined the pv magazine team in 2013 and specializes in power electronics (inverters) and battery storage. Ian also reports on the UK solar market, having worked as a print and web journalist in Britain for various multimedia companies, covering topics ranging from renewable energy and sustainability to real estate, sport and film.More articles from Ian Clover [email protected] Related content The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Orig… Asia Pacific’s solarized digitization agenda Selva Ozelli, Esq. 23 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The virtual 7th Asia-Pacific Climate Change Adaptation Forum was hosted in March by Japan’s Ministry of the Environment,… EU to offer expertise to drive renewables-friendly policy across Africa Cosmas Mwirigi 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The oft-heard industry call for more supportive policy for renewables, this time in Africa, has prompted the European Co… The weekend read: PV feed in, certified pv magazine 1 May 2021 pv-magazine.com As more renewable energy capacity is built, commissioned, and connected, grid stability concerns are driving rapid regulatory changes. 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For more information please see our Data Protection Policy. Subscribe to our global magazine SubscribeOur events and webinars Household solutions for maximizing self-consumption using smart contro… , pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsRobert van Keulen, Technical Manager, GrowattGautham Ram, Assistant Professor and Researcher, D… Virtual Roundtables USA 17 November 2020 pv-magazine.com We will be hosting the second edition of our successful Virtual Roundtables this year in November. The program will be f… Reducing solar project risk for extreme weather 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsDaniel H.S. 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Hardworking Team Sets Canadian Show Jumping Tournament Apart

first_img“They run one less ring than they usually do at their other shows so that they can focus most of their efforts on the grand prix ring and the elite athletes,” explains Roy, speaking about the show’s management team and all of various players who work together to ensure the event’s success.  “We have the best footing, the best jumps, the best stewards and the best security.  We have professional announcers and professional ring crew.  The ring crew there is probably as good as at any other venue in the country.  The management puts in extra effort to decorate the ring and make sure that everything, including the competition, is first-class and high quality.” “A lot of dedicated volunteers and hard working management make these other events held at the horse show a great success,” says Pabst of Nobleton, ON.  “The committees meet once a month where we come together with all our thoughts and ideas.  In general, we just have a very hardworking group.  We also have very supportive and dedicated sponsors as well as very active community members who have donated items for our auction and tombola.  I just can’t say enough good things about the entire team.” Sanctioned by the International Equestrian Federation (FEI), the Canadian Show Jumping Tournament has secured two-time Olympic course designer Leopoldo Palacios of Venezuela to set the tracks in the grand prix ring.  Presiding over that ring and this year’s featured event, the $100,000 Caledon Cup, will be Canada’s own Cathy Roy, who is an accredited FEI jumper judge as well as an Equine Canada Senior Judge. “It’s a high-end show,” explains Roy of King, ON.  “The elite riders like Eric Lamaze, Ian Millar, Mac Cone, all of our Canadian team members who are dispersed all year, usually come together at the Canadian Show Jumping Tournament.  It’s one of the first times we get to see them all come together to compete against each one another.” Subscribe to the Horse Sport newsletter and get an exclusive bonus digital edition! Tags: Canadian Show Jumping Tournament, Caledon Equestrian Park, Cathy Roy, Leopoldo Palacios, SIGN UP The Family Village will be open Saturday and Sunday, September 24 and 25, and will feature entertaining and educational interactive displays and attractions.  The Foxbury Farm Horseless Horse Show is also returning this year, allowing children to jump kid-sized obstacles on foot in a competition of their own.  New in the Family Village is a public tombola, where people can buy tickets and win great prizes on the spot. Not only do the best riders in the country come together to compete at the Canadian Show Jumping Tournament, the best team of horse show staff is assembled as well. “We’re focused on major charities and we have a family component as well,” says Linda Pabst, a long-time volunteer at the Tournament who acts as Chair of the Children’s Wish Jumping for Dreams committee as well as Chair of the Unique Boutiques and Family Village committee. When the Canadian Show Jumping Tournament returns to the Caledon Equestrian Park in Palgrave, ON from September 21-25, spectators will be treated to some of the best show jumping competition in the world.  Helping make the event a great success are the dozens of officials, volunteers, sponsors and staff who work tirelessly behind the scenes. We’ll send you our regular newsletter and include you in our monthly giveaways. PLUS, you’ll receive our exclusive Rider Fitness digital edition with 15 exercises for more effective riding. It’s more than just management putting in that extra effort. “The tournament hires the best of the best and because of that, everyone knows their job very well,” continues Roy.  “Everything runs so smoothly because none of us have to ask what’s expected of us; we already know.” Gate proceeds from the 2011 Canadian Show Jumping Tournament will go to support the Palgrave Rotary and other local charities. For more information on the Canadian Show Jumping Tournament, please visit http://www.equiman.com/. More from Horse Sport:Christilot Boylen Retires From Team SportAfter an exemplary career as one of Canada’s top Dressage riders, seven-time Olympian Christilot Boylen has announced her retirement from team competition.2020 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair CancelledFor only the second time in its history, The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair has been cancelled but plans are being made for some virtual competitions.Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Statement on 2020 EventAs the Province of Ontario starts to reopen, The Royal’s Board and staff will adhere to all recommendations put forward by government and health officials.Government Financial Assistance for Ontario FarmersOntario Equestrian has recently released this update of several financial assistance packages available, including those for farm business. While the caliber of competition is what draws spectators to the Canadian Show Jumping Tournament, it’s the other events held during the four days that set the show apart.  A core group of volunteers manages everything from the activities surrounding the annual Children’s Wish presentation, where a recipient’s wish for a pony is granted, to the on-site trade fair with its various exhibits. Horse Sport Enews Email* The athletes themselves will also have the opportunity to take part in the fundraising efforts by participating in the popular ‘Ribbon Campaign’ taking place throughout the duration of the Canadian Show Jumping Tournament.  By donating any ribbons won, competitors contribute their corresponding prize money to the Children’s Wish Foundation. The Children’s Wish Foundation of Canada will once again be the beneficiary of this year’s Canadian Show Jumping Tournament.  Over the past two years, the Tournament has granted a child’s wish for a pony to two lucky recipients and raised more than $70,000 for the Children’s Wish Foundation.  This year’s Children’s Wish Celebration, featuring a luncheon with live and silent auctions, followed in the evening by the Children’s Wish BBQ and Dance, will be held on Saturday, September 24. Comprised of three legs of competition held over three days, the $100,000 Caledon Cup, presented by Aviva Elite, Peel Maryborough, and RAM Equestrian, is the ‘triple crown of show jumping’ and will see competitors fighting for top honours.last_img read more