Health Ministry organises workshop on health and nutrition initiatives

first_img By EH News Bureau on October 23, 2018 In order to address the disparities, which are largely located in pockets within states, the government has identified 117 Aspirational DistrictsThe Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, in collaboration with Ministry of Women and Child Development, organised a one-day National Workshop for Orientation of District Officials of Aspirational Districts on Health and Nutrition recently.The workshop was inaugurated by Ashwini Kumar Choubey and Anupriya Patel, Ministers of State for Health and Family Welfare. At the function, the State Health Ministers unveiled the Operational Guidelines on Aspirational Districts for Health and Nutrition and launched the e-Mitra mobile application.Speaking at the event, Choubey stated that most of the developmental gains for the country will come from aspirational districts. Therefore, to achieve equity and accelerated improvements in human development indicators, the government has focused its energy on these districts, he said.Dr Vinod Paul, Member, NITI Ayog, Rakesh Srivastava, Secretary, Ministry of Women and Child Development and Preeti Sudan, Secretary (HFW) were also present at the inaugural function.In his address, Choubey further stated that this is a first of its kind initiative by identifying 117 districts under the ‘Aspirational Districts’ programme with an aim to quickly and effectively transform them. He added that India has made great progress in the context of health indicators and have practically achieved MDG targets.“The decline in Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR) has been the highest since the last several decades which has declined by 37 points from 167/ lakh live births in 2011-13 to 130/ lakh live births in 2014-16 within a span of just three years. This accounts for an impressive 22 per cent reduction in MMR since 2013,” he said.Addressing the participants, Patel said that the government is committed to achieving the goals of the National Health Policy 2017, and of the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030, “We have achieved impressive results in terms of accessibility and quality of services which resulted in reduced deaths of mothers, newborns and children, and improved health outcomes overall,” she said.Patel further said that in order to address the disparities, which are largely located in pockets within states, the government has identified 117 Aspirational Districts. “It is expected that sustained and intensive efforts in programme implementation, monitoring and support will improve health and nutrition indicators and ensure that all people have equal access to high quality health care,” she elaborated.The Prime Minister of India has coined the nomenclature of Aspirational Districts, thereby affirming a commitment to improvement in key indicators of these districts, so as to achieve the vision of a New India by 2022, she said.The operational guidelines on Aspirational Districts will provide a framework for implementing action to be undertaken for various health initiatives to guide the state, district, block programme officers and other stakeholders in organizing various activities expected to meet the vision for health by leveraging health and nutrition initiatives to bring transformation in the lives of people and meet their aspirations to be healthy.The e-Mitra (Mobile Integrated Toolkit RMNCH+A ) app has been designed to complement the Aspirational District Programme and offers a one stop solution to access RMNCH+A related statistics from different sources through a combination of approaches.The workshop was attended by the senior officers from the Ministry of Health, MoWCD and NHSRC along with the representatives from 28 States, 117 Aspirational District Official and development partners like WHO, UNICEF, USAID, BMGF, TATA Trust and UNFPA etc., and civil society organisations. Read Article Related Posts Health Ministry organises workshop on health and nutrition initiatives Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals releases first “Comprehensive Textbook of COVID-19” MaxiVision Eye Hospitals launches “Mucormycosis Early Detection Centre” Sharecenter_img Phoenix Business Consulting invests in telehealth platform Healpha The missing informal workers in India’s vaccine story News WHO tri-regional policy dialogue seeks solutions to challenges facing international mobility of health professionals Heartfulness group of organisations launches ‘Healthcare by Heartfulness’ COVID care app Menopause to become the next game-changer in global femtech solutions industry by 2025last_img read more

Crime Watch – A literal falling out

first_img It’s a good thing that Santa Monica Police have LAPD to help them. Anonymous says: HomeBad BehaviorCrime Watch – A literal falling out Jan. 16, 2020 at 6:00 amBad BehaviorCrimeCRIME WATCHFeaturedNewsCrime Watch – A literal falling outeditor1 year agoarrestcrimesanta monica policesmpd On November 10, 2019 at approximately 10 p.m.In the area of Lincoln and Broadway, a female was driving her boyfriend to an area in Los Angeles. While driving, they got into an argument about the boyfriend’s use of narcotics. He became upset and slapped her across the face. He then punched her and attempted to strangle her. The female grabbed her boyfriend’s phone threatening to throw it out the window if he did not stop attacking her. The boyfriend stopped his attack and opened up the car door. The female then drove off causing her boyfriend to fall out of the car. She was able to call the police. Police were unable to find the suspect that evening and placed a want in the system. On January 1, 2020 LAPD arrested the suspect and brought him to the Santa Monica Jail for booking. Chase Farrington McFadden, 32, of Los Angeles was arrested for inflicting corporal injury on spouse/cohabitant/Etc. Bail was set at $50,000.Tags :arrestcrimesanta monica policesmpdshare on Facebookshare on Twittershow 1 comment Comments are closed. January 17, 2020 at 4:43 AM 1 Comment Man Sentenced for Shooting at Venice BarWoodacres sale price: $20 millionYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall7 hours agoBriefsLos Angeles Sheriff’s deputy accused of destroying evidence of 2019 assaultAssociated Press10 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson17 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter17 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor17 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press17 hours agolast_img read more

Welcome to the Not-So-Normal major season

first_imgWhen play gets underway on Thursday at TPC Harding Park it will end a Grand Slam hiatus that stretched 382 days. As the COVID-19 pandemic rocked the foundation of the golf world, the loudest headlines centered on the major championships. The U.S. Open and Masters were relocated to the fall with hopes of better days and the promise of a vaccine, while The Open Championship was pushed to 2021. The PGA Championship, which was originally scheduled for the second week of May, moved to the front of the line. The strangest of years will serve up the most surreal major championship since the U.S. Open was replaced in 1942 by the Hale America Open (which was won by Ben Hogan, and which historians argue should count toward the Hawk’s major championship haul), and it’s not just because it’s been more than a year since Shane Lowry won the game’s last major. “It’s odd, but the whole 2020 thing, very odd,” said Jason Day with a familiar redundancy of words. “We’ve got no fans out here. I mean, it’s just a whole kind of cluster, you know what I’m talking about. Just got to kind of just roll with it.” News & Opinion Monday Scramble: Top 10 favorites for the PGA BY Ryan Lavner  — August 2, 2020 at 9:40 AM It’s August, but the season’s first major is finally here. And with it comes a look at the top-10 favorites to hoist the Wanamaker Trophy on Sunday. Sure, let’s start with the lack of fans. It’s not as though players haven’t had enough time to get used to the silence that’s become the soundtrack to golf’s return, and Day’s “roll with it” mentality has been widely embraced. But this is a major. With San Francisco hosting its first major since 2012, this week’s PGA Championship was going to be a standing-room-only and raucous affair played on a public gem. Instead, it will be 156 players and caddies filling the void. The championship will still be played at TPC Harding Park, which has made cameos as a PGA Tour venue before but is hosting its first major, as a party with no invited guests. Since the Tour’s restart in early June it’s been a similar scene of empty fairways and peaceful fields and that’s been fine, but this was supposed to be different. “All these tournaments are created by their atmosphere and everyone has a different feel, and every tournament since coming back off the lockdown has felt the same, whether it’s the Colonial or the Travelers Championship or the Memorial or whatever it’s been,” Rory McIlroy said. “It’s the people and the atmosphere, that’s what makes a tournament and when you don’t have that, there’s nothing really for them to differentiate themselves. “Obviously, the courses are different, setups are a little different, but at the end of the day, it’s all sort of the same.” Harding Park will be ringed with predictably thick rough and the greens will deliver the required zip, the competition will be of championship quality and officials will still hand the Wanamaker Trophy to a smiling champion on Sunday. “It’s going to be weird to not have fans next week, but we’ve been playing with no fans for a while now so we’re kind of used to it,” Day said. “I think there’s going to be a little bit more pressure and intensity next week, I understand that, but I think a lot of the guys kind of understand what needs to be done.” The intensity will resemble something close to what we’ve become accustomed to but everything else will be different. And it’s just not the lack of fans that will fuel this week’s dystopian vibe. Harding Park has never hosted a major so there’s nothing to compare it to. When the U.S. Open is played in September at Winged Foot, also without fans, there will be a collective recall to help fill in the blanks. It remains to be seen if fans will return for November’s Masters but if not, well, it’s Augusta National and the cathedral creates its own audience. Three-peat? Can Koepka win another Wanamaker Trophy? Vintage footage of the 2009 Presidents Cup or ’15 WGC-Match Play at Harding Park won’t be enough to fill in those gaps. There’s also this week’s field. Major championships are defined by the depth of the tee sheet as the game’s best flock to compete for the ultimate prize, but since the Tour’s restart golf’s best have traveled well. After three months of quarantine the fields at both Colonial and Harbour Town were historically deep and even last week’s WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational assembled an impressive cast despite some high-profile no-shows, most notably Tiger Woods, Justin Rose and Adam Scott. The best example of this was last month’s Memorial, which drew an 803 strength of field, according to the world ranking. By comparison, last year’s PGA Championship had a 901 strength of field. For the vast viewing audience that has tuned in since golf’s restart, the relative rankings and eerie tranquility haven’t seemed to impact what’s become a television-only product. Those distinctions are left only to the players. “It’s not going to have as much of a major-like feel because of not having fans, so that’s something that’s going to be drastically different,” Justin Thomas said. “But in terms of a golf course setup and everything else, it will still be very major-like, I’m sure, so we’re all going to experience the same thing.” After a 382-day wait, even a “different” major is worth savoring.last_img read more

Answering Critiques of Specification in William Dembski’s Design Filter

first_img A Physician Describes How Behe Changed His MindLife’s Origin — A “Mystery” Made AccessibleCodes Are Not Products of PhysicsIxnay on the Ambriancay PlosionexhayDesign Triangulation: My Thanksgiving Gift to All Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Requesting a (Partial) Retraction from Darrel Falk and BioLogos Evolution NewsEvolution News & Science Today (EN) provides original reporting and analysis about evolution, neuroscience, bioethics, intelligent design and other science-related issues, including breaking news about scientific research. It also covers the impact of science on culture and conflicts over free speech and academic freedom in science. Finally, it fact-checks and critiques media coverage of scientific issues. Share Congratulations to Science Magazine for an Honest Portrayal of Darwin’s Descent of Man Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Jane Goodall Meets the God Hypothesis The criticism centers on William Dembski’s explanatory filter for detecting design, especially Dembski’s crucial innovation, which was to include specification as the filter’s final step. Critics say specification is an ad hoc addition, conjured up by ID theorists for no good reason except to prop up ID theory. No one else uses it, they say. They’re wrong, says Holloway. Dembski accurately formalized a filter we use so often that we’re like fish in the sea. We are unaware of it because it’s ubiquitous. To prove his point, Holloway comes armed with powerful examples from information theory, communication theory, and cryptography. center_img Tagscommunication theorycryptographyEric Hollowayinformation theoryintelligent designRobert CrowtherspecificationWilliam Dembski,Trending Origin of Life: Brian Miller Distills a Debate Between Dave Farina and James Tour “A Summary of the Evidence for Intelligent Design”: The Study Guide Intelligent Design Answering Critiques of Specification in William Dembski’s Design FilterEvolution News @DiscoveryCSCAugust 31, 2020, 4:18 PM Recommended Photo credit: Jakob Owens via UnsplashOn a new episode of ID the Future, host Robert Crowther interviews Eric Holloway, Associate Fellow at the Walter Bradley Center for Natural and Artificial Intelligence, about Holloway’s recent article answering a common criticism of intelligent design theory. Download the podcast or listen to it here.last_img read more

Hearing Officer Sides with Foes of Megaloads

first_img Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. Email BOISE, Idaho – An administrative hearing judge has determined that opponents of an oil company’s plan to haul four massive loads of refinery equipment through the scenic U.S. Highway 12 corridor in northern Idaho should be allowed to intervene and challenge the state’s decision to grant travel permitsBoise attorney Merlyn Clark also determined Wednesday that Idaho Transportation Department Director Brian Ness should schedule a formal hearing to give foes a forum to make their case against the permits issued last month to ConocoPhillips.Clark’s conclusions are only recommendations, and it’s up to Ness to decide the next step for the agency.But his decision is clearly a victory for foes of the shipments and another costly setback to ConocoPhillips, which has been waiting for weeks to get two huge coke drums from the port Lewiston to its refinery in Billings, Mont.Company officials say delays have already cost the company $2.5 million. But that total could reach $40 million if the drums don’t arrive in Billings by next spring, leading to a possible unplanned work stoppage at a key gasoline producer for Idaho, Montana and other Rocky Mountain states.“We are disappointed,” said company spokesman Bill Stephens. “We do not believe the recommendation adequately accounts for the careful planning by ConocoPhillips.”The company has 14 days to ask Clark to reconsider.Then it’s up to Ness, who can accept, reject, modify or hold Clark’s recommendation for a full, contested hearing on the permits. Agency spokesman Adam Rush said Ness will take time to review the findings before making a decision.Opponents of the shipments cheered Clark’s findings, saying they look forward to the chance to get involved in the highway agency’s decision-making process.“This is a good step forward,” said Laird Lucas, the Boise attorney representing the three opponents of the shipments. “It allows the people who live along the highway, who own businesses along Highway 12 to have their voices heard. It’s been a behind-closed-doors deal so far. I’m glad we’ll have a chance now to participate.”During a hearing last Friday, Lucas told Clark the agency failed to adequately consider the public safety and convenience when approving the company’s travel plans. He also said his clients face personal health and economic risks if the loads are allowed to proceed and deserve the chance to get involved in the process.Clark agreed, finding that Linwood Laughy and his wife, Karen “Borg” Hendrickson, and businessman Peter Grubb, have a direct and substantial interest in the case. Laughy and Hendrickson live along the highway, while Grubb owns a lodge and outfitting business along the scenic byway.While their objections to the ConocoPhillips shipments are the focus of this case, critics also say the agency’s actions now will set a precedent for hundreds of oversized loads being considered for a curvy road that traces the trail once trekked by Lewis and Clark and parallels the federally protected Lochsa and Clearwater rivers.ExxonMobil Corp. already has delivered more than a dozen massive modules of massive equipment at the port in Lewiston. The company is seeking overlegal permits to haul its loads through Idaho, into Montana and north to the Kearl Oil Sands in Alberta, Canada.Each of the Exxon loads would weigh 300 tons, stretch 227 feet long, reach 27 feet high and 29 feet in width — wide enough to take up both lanes of the highway. Like the ConocoPhillips loads, trucks would roll only at night and be required to stop every 15 minutes along pullouts to allow traffic to pass.ConocoPhillips’ troubles have frustrated Idaho business groups like loggers, miners and farmers, who view the setbacks as a threat to their own ability to ship oversized loads across state highways.“We should all be concerned about the extra steps being required of these particular loads,” said Alex LaBeau, president of the Idaho Association of Commerce and Industry, the leading business group in the state. “These permits are crucial to industries that make up the backbone of the state.”last_img read more

Judge Hears Final Arguments in Badger-Two Medicine Case

first_img Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. Blackfeet tribal leaders embarked on yet another pilgrimage to Washington, D.C. on March 14 as part of their years-long effort to furnish protections on the Badger-Two Medicine region and permanently remove the last remaining oil and gas leases remaining in the area.At stake in the federal court battle is whether to uphold the Interior Department’s 2016 decision to cancel oil and gas leases in the 130,000-acre Badger-Two Medicine area, a culturally and ecologically sacred region to the tribe. The area is a federally recognized Traditional Cultural District along Montana’s Rocky Mountain Front. Set within the Helena-Lewis and Clark National Forest, the area is bordered by Glacier National Park, the Bob Marshall Wilderness and the Blackfeet Indian Reservation.Interior Secretary Sally Jewell canceled the oil and gas lease formerly held by the Louisiana-based Solenex, LLC, in the Hall Creek area of the Badger-Two Medicine region in March 2016. Government officials concluded the lease was issued in violation of federal laws designed to protect environmental and cultural resources on federal public lands, and found there was a lack of consultation with tribal officials prior to the issuance of the lease.Solenex then filed a lawsuit in federal court appealing the lease-cancellation decision, arguing the federal government lacks the statutory and regulatory authority to rescind them because the leases were legally issued.The future of the Badger-Two Medicine has been in legal limbo since.The March 14 hearing centered on opposing motions for summary judgment, which would resolve the dispute.Assistant Attorney General John C. Cruden and Ruth Ann Storey, of the U.S. Department of Justice, served as counsel for the federal defendants.Tim Preso, attorney for Earthjustice, argued on behalf of the Pikuni Traditionalist Association, Blackfeet Headwaters Alliance, Glacier-Two Medicine Alliance, Montana Wilderness Association, National Parks Conservation Association, and The Wilderness Society, who are listed as defendant-interveners in the case.“There is no dispute that the Secretary has authority to administratively cancel invalid leases,” according to the defense.Tyson Running Wolf, secretary of the Blackfeet Tribal Business Council, and John Murray, tribal historic preservation officer, attended the hearing on behalf of the tribe.The Denver-based property rights organization Mountain States Legal Foundation represented Solenex, and Steven J. Lechner delivered arguments on behalf of the company, saying Jewell’s decision to cancel the company’s 33-year-old lease and disapprove its application for a permit to drill should be held unlawful and set aside.Presiding over the hearing, U.S. District Judge Richard Leon heard attorneys debate the lawfulness of the Interior Department’s lease-cancellation decision. The Interior Department and the tribal and conservation groups represented by Earthjustice argue that the lease was invalidly issued in violation of federal law, that the Interior Department acted lawfully in canceling the lease and that the lease-cancellation decision should be upheld.Attorneys on both sides say that a decision in the case is still months away.In a separate but related case, a prominent Texas oilman has sued the federal government alleging that it illegally canceled his oil and gas lease in the Badger-Two Medicine region. The lawsuit filed by W.A. Moncrief names as defendants the U.S. Department of the Interior and the Montana-Dakotas Office of the Bureau of Land Management.Like the Solenex case, the Moncrief suit came on the heels of the Obama administration’s historic decision to cancel the final two remaining leases on the Badger-Two Medicine, marking a hard-fought victory for members of the Blackfeet Nation who have worked to jettison a host of energy leases from their sacred homeland for three decades.Devon Energy voluntarily relinquished its 15 leases in the Badger-Two Medicine, but Moncrief and Solenex have been determined to challenge the lease cancellations. Emaillast_img read more

53 new confirmed Covid-19 cases in Ireland

first_img Previous articleDeclan Devine looks ahead to Derry City’s clash with St Pat’sNext articleDelight for Keith Cowan as Glentoran win Irish Cup News Highland Twitter Homepage BannerNews Facebook WhatsApp Google+ By News Highland – August 2, 2020 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Twitter Pinterest Pinterestcenter_img Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Google+ Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme WhatsApp Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows There’ve been no new death according to latest figures from NPHET, while there have been 53 new confirmed cases.80% were under the age of 45.45 are associated with outbreaks or close contacts of a confirmed case.While 4 cases have been identified as community transmission. News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th 53 new confirmed Covid-19 cases in Irelandlast_img read more

Gov. Deal Appoints New DeKalb School Board Members

first_img ‘It’s Fractured’: Georgia Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan On Healing Republican Party Related Stories Share For Whom The Bell Rings Legal Advocate Discusses Medical Abuse At Shut Down Georgia ICE Facility Add to My List In My List Governor Nathan Deal has just announced the names of the people he is appointing to replace the six members of the DeKalb School Board.  WABE’s Martha Dalton was there and tweeted some bulletins from the Governor’s press conference, which we have summarized below:The newly appointed school board members are John Coleman, Michael Irwin, David Campbell, Joyce Morley, Karen Carter, and Thaddeus Mayfield.Gov. Deal said that he told the new school board members that he doesn’t want governance to be an issue, and that their board duties are to take high priority.None of the previous DeKalb school board members were reappointed because Gov. Deal wanted members to be able to start with a clean slate.  He indicated that the new board members were selected to reflect the racial makeup of the school districts they will represent.When asked about potential legal challenges, Gov. Deal said that he is following the law, including the recent federal ruling that allowed him to proceed.The Governor said that several of the new DeKalb school board members are experienced in mediation.Gov. Deal emphasized that maintaining the accreditation of DeKalb’s school system is his primary focus.We will provide more detail as it becomes available.For updates, follow the WABE newsroom on Twitter at @wabenews. Follow Martha Dalton at @wabedalton. last_img read more

Solar Frontier eyes the Americas

first_imgSolar Frontier eyes the AmericasThin-film module maker Solar Frontier is seeking to expand into the Americas. The 280MW pipeline of Gestamp-developed projects in the U.S. is seen as the company’s ticket into the market. July 28, 2015 Shamsiah Ali Oettinger Manufacturing Markets Markets & Policy Share The leading Japanese CIS technology developers completed the acqusition of Gestamp Solar’s 280MW U.S. pipeline in April this year. These include ten projects in California under various stages of development. “Our task was to figure out how we can re-enter the American market and build up a future business model,” stated Yuichi Kuroda, vice president of international business for Solar Frontier to Bloomberg.Solar Frontier plans to sell all 280MW of projects by the end of 2016. Kuroda also added that the company’s limited presence in the U.S. meant that it could not take advantage of the tax credit. Hence developing projects and then selling them to buyers who can enjoy the tax breaks makes more sense.Popular content Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… iAbout these recommendations Share Shamsiah Ali OettingerMore articles from Shamsiah Ali Oettinger [email protected] Related content African solar installers feel the pinch of rising panel prices Max Hall 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com With Chinese manufacturers having warned they will pass on escalating component costs, and shipping expenses soaring sin… The weekend read: PV feed in, certified pv magazine 1 May 2021 pv-magazine.com As more renewable energy capacity is built, commissioned, and connected, grid stability concerns are driving rapid regulatory changes. ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German enginee… Higher performance with bigger modules a ‘no brainer’ Sandra Enkhardt 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Jan Bicker, who replaced Steve O’Neil as the CEO of REC on March 1, says that one of his top priorities is the ongoing d… Hungary launches third renewables auction Emiliano Bellini 30 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The Hungarian energy regulator expects to contract around 300 GWh of renewable energy in the procurement exercise.April… No bifacial solar in West Africa? That’s likely to change soon Cosmas Mwirigi 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com A technology-focused event held by the Africa Solar Industry Association has heard development pipelines across the cont… African solar installers feel the pinch of rising panel prices Max Hall 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com With Chinese manufacturers having warned they will pass on escalating component costs, and shipping expenses soaring sin… The weekend read: PV feed in, certified pv magazine 1 May 2021 pv-magazine.com As more renewable energy capacity is built, commissioned, and connected, grid stability concerns are driving rapid regulatory changes. ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German enginee… Higher performance with bigger modules a ‘no brainer’ Sandra Enkhardt 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Jan Bicker, who replaced Steve O’Neil as the CEO of REC on March 1, says that one of his top priorities is the ongoing d… Hungary launches third renewables auction Emiliano Bellini 30 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The Hungarian energy regulator expects to contract around 300 GWh of renewable energy in the procurement exercise.April… No bifacial solar in West Africa? That’s likely to change soon Cosmas Mwirigi 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com A technology-focused event held by the Africa Solar Industry Association has heard development pipelines across the cont… African solar installers feel the pinch of rising panel prices Max Hall 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com With Chinese manufacturers having warned they will pass on escalating component costs, and shipping expenses soaring sin… 123456Elsewhere on pv magazine… Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… MIBEL alcanzó nuevamente los precios más bajos de Europa mientras subieron en el resto de mercados eléctricos pv magazine 23 March 2021 pv-magazine.es En la tercera semana de marzo los precios de la mayoría de mercados eléctricos europeos subieron, mientras que MIBEL mar… Tasmanian Labor installs solar at the top of its campaign promises Blake Matich 8 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Tasmania (TAS) is going to the polls on May 1, and the opposition Labor Party has put forth a $20 million plan to fund l… India closing in on 7 GW of rooftop solar pv magazine 13 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com India’s cumulative installed capacity of rooftop solar stood at 6,792 MW as of December 31, 2020, with 1,352 MW having b… Spotlight on Australian solar Bella Peacock 21 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Calculating the average sunlight hours data from the Bureau of Meteorology from January toDecember 2020, Darwin was cro… Q&A: EEW’s $500 million Gladstone solar to hydrogen project is just the start Blake Matich 18 March 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com pv magazine Australia: Australia is the testing ground for a lot of different aspects of the future green hydrogen market. Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… MIBEL alcanzó nuevamente los precios más bajos de Europa mientras subieron en el resto de mercados eléctricos pv magazine 23 March 2021 pv-magazine.es En la tercera semana de marzo los precios de la mayoría de mercados eléctricos europeos subieron, mientras que MIBEL mar… Tasmanian Labor installs solar at the top of its campaign promises Blake Matich 8 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Tasmania (TAS) is going to the polls on May 1, and the opposition Labor Party has put forth a $20 million plan to fund l… India closing in on 7 GW of rooftop solar pv magazine 13 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com India’s cumulative installed capacity of rooftop solar stood at 6,792 MW as of December 31, 2020, with 1,352 MW having b… Spotlight on Australian solar Bella Peacock 21 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Calculating the average sunlight hours data from the Bureau of Meteorology from January toDecember 2020, Darwin was cro… Q&A: EEW’s $500 million Gladstone solar to hydrogen project is just the start Blake Matich 18 March 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com pv magazine Australia: Australia is the testing ground for a lot of different aspects of the future green hydrogen market. Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… 123456Leave a Reply Cancel replyPlease be mindful of our community standards.Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentName * Email * Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. By submitting this form you agree to pv magazine using your data for the purposes of publishing your comment.Your personal data will only be disclosed or otherwise transmitted to third parties for the purposes of spam filtering or if this is necessary for technical maintenance of the website. Any other transfer to third parties will not take place unless this is justified on the basis of applicable data protection regulations or if pv magazine is legally obliged to do so.You may revoke this consent at any time with effect for the future, in which case your personal data will be deleted immediately. Otherwise, your data will be deleted if pv magazine has processed your request or the purpose of data storage is fulfilled.Further information on data privacy can be found in our Data Protection Policy.iAbout these recommendationsiAbout these recommendationsKeep up to date pv magazine Global offers daily updates of the latest photovoltaics news. We also offer comprehensive global coverage of the most important solar markets worldwide. Select one or more editions for targeted, up to date information delivered straight to your inbox.Email* Select Edition(s)*Hold Ctrl or Cmd to select multiple editions.Tap to select multiple editions.Global (English, daily)Germany (German, daily)U.S. (English, daily)Australia (English, daily)China (Chinese, weekly)India (English, daily)Latin America (Spanish, daily)Brazil (Portuguese, weekly)Mexico (Spanish, daily)Spain (Spanish, daily)France (French, daily)We send newsletters with the approximate frequency outlined for each edition above, with occasional additional notifications about events and webinars. We measure how often our emails are opened, and which links our readers click. To provide a secure and reliable service, we send our email with MailChimp, which means we store email addresses and analytical data on their servers. You can opt out of our newsletters at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of every mail. For more information please see our Data Protection Policy. Subscribe to our global magazine SubscribeOur events and webinars Insight @ Energy Storage North America 2020 11 November 2020 pv-magazine.com Developed and moderated by pv magazine, the panel sessions address a hot topic within the industry, from multiple angles. Grid code compliance in megawatt projects 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsEhsan Nadeem Khan, Grid Code Compliance Engineer, meteocontrolModeratorsMarian Willuhn, Editor… Reducing solar project risk for extreme weather 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsDaniel H.S. Chang, VP of Business Development | RETCGreg Beardsworth, Sr. Director of Product M… iAbout these recommendations pv magazine print Battery testing builds certainty pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Owners and operators of energy storage systems, as well as investors, need transparent ways to evaluate battery performance. Korea shifts into top gear pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com There is a fresh sense of urgency and common purpose in South Korea toward combating climate change. In 2021, government… Final thought: Solar ethics, forced labor pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Abigail Ross Hopper, President and CEO, Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA)Issue 04 – 2021 April 7, 2021 pv maga… Time to standardize pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Not all quality control plans, processes and agreements are created equal, writes Frédéric Dross, the VP of strategic de… We all trust the performance ratio test pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is a… PV feed in, certified pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com As more renewable energy capacity is built, commissioned, and connected, grid stability concerns are driving rapid regulatory changes. iAbout these recommendationslast_img read more

Utility Reaches Agreement in Texas Over Proposed Wind Farms

first_img Linkedin A similar agreement was reached in recent months with the New Mexico attorney general’s office, consumer advocates and others in New Mexico. It’s now up to utility regulators in both states to approve the $1.6 billion project. Final decisions could come as early as March. Facebook 2.28.2018 No posts to display Xcel Energy on Tuesday announced the proposed deal with several parties in Texas, which would guarantee customers see a positive net benefit from the wind farms for the first 10 years of operation. The agreement also caps related construction costs that could be recovered through customer rates. Utility Reaches Agreement in Texas Over Proposed Wind Farms Avista considering RNG on way to net-zero carbon goals ALBUQUERQUE, New Mexico — A utility has reached an agreement with rural electric cooperatives and others as it looks for regulatory approval to build two massive wind farms along the Texas-New Mexico border. By chloecox – Plans by Xcel call for adding wind farms near Portales, New Mexico, and in Hale County, Texas, and purchasing more wind power from facilities owned by NextEra Energy Resources. Xcel estimates the steps would result in enough electricity to serve more than 440,000 homes. Xcel officials say the proposed wind farms would take advantage of what has become the least expensive generating resource in the region to reduce fuel costs and ultimately save customers money on their monthly bills. Voith Hydro supplying pumped storage equipment to pair with Idaho combined solar-wind project Wind turbines already dot the plains, from central New Mexico to the Texas Panhandle, and Texas leads the nation by far when it comes to installed wind-power capacity. While renewable-energy advocates have supported plans to install more turbines in eastern New Mexico, examiners with the state Public Regulation Commission have been careful to consider the financial effects on customer rates. Analysts with the U.S. Energy Information Administration predicted earlier this year that wind power is expected to surpass hydroelectric power as the largest renewable electricity generation source. That is based on weather patterns as well as the expectation of new wind farms coming online in 2018 and 2019. Previous articleDelta Energy Center Finishes Repairs, Returns to OperationsNext articleRES to Build 50 MW Solar Project in West Texas chloecox For example, a hearing is planned in early March to consider a proposal that would allow Xcel to recover lost earnings that accumulate between the time when the wind farms actually come online and when the commission approves new rates for cost recovery and profits on the projects. Facebook By Susan Montoya Bryan, Associated Press Renewable project management firm Bradley acquired by Bureau Veritas Twitter Linkedin “We know these projects will deliver lower-cost electricity, protect the environment and stimulate local economic development,” David Hudson, Xcel’s New Mexico and Texas president, said in a statement. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TAGSNextEra Xcel officials have warned that if rate proposals related to the wind farms are rejected by New Mexico regulators, the utility might have to abandon the project. RenewablesNew ProjectsWind Twitterlast_img read more