Auburn not at point of no return on QB Jeremy Johnson

first_img Session ID: 2020-09-18:b9963b1a89a35da31fdb1924 Player ID: videojs-brightcove-player-266204-4498197948001 OK Close Modal DialogCaption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.AUBURN – Auburn has not passed the point of no return with junior quarterback Jeremy Johnson three weeks into the season.Auburn offensive coordinator Rhett Lashlee said Sunday Johnson is the acknowledged that a change at quarterback can be forthcoming if the Tigers continue to not get any progress out of Johnson.Lashlee also said Sunday he considered Johnson ‘our starter right now’ even after another disappointing performance at LSU in a 45-21 loss at Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge, La.After being specifically asked about Jeremy Johnson’s starting role, Auburn head coach Gus Malzahn said following the embarrassing 45-21 loss at LSU that all positions would be evaluated this week in practice.“There’s always a point at that, at every position,” Lashlee said. “You got to compete every day. We got good players on this team. We got good players that are playing the other positions. Everybody’s got to compete. We’ll put the guys out there ready to play.”Malzahn stated on his ‘Tiger Talk’ radio show Monday night that the staff thought Johnson showed them some progress in the second half of the blowout loss at LSU. Johnson ended Saturday just 141 total yards (100 passing and 41 rushing) in the loss at LSU Saturday.“He knows he didn’t have his best day, but he made some plays in the second half and he competed,” Malzahn said.Auburn Tigers quarterback Jeremy Johnson (6) throws a pass as Louisiana State linebacker Kendell Beckwith rushes him during the NCAA football game between LSU Tigers and Auburn on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015, at Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge, La. LSU Tigers defeated Auburn Tigers 45-21. Albert Cesare / AdvertiserAuburn Tigers quarterback Jeremy Johnson (6) throws a pass as Louisiana State linebacker Kendell Beckwith rushes him during the NCAA football game between LSU Tigers and Auburn on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015, at Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge, La. LSU Tigers defeated Auburn Tigers 45-21. Albert Cesare / AdvertiserDuring his radio show, Malzahn was asked a question by a fan specifically about if Johnson is having trouble getting the signals from the sideline. Malzahn responded by saying the problem and confusion for the Montgomery native is happening after the snap and not before.Johnson’s backup, Sean White, has yet to take a snap in his collegiate snap but the Boca Raton, Fla., native made it clear in August he was being prepared to play in case something happened with Johnson.“It can be hard because your competitive nature you want to get out there,” White said on Aug. 18. “You want to play. You want to get out there. You feel like you can succeed but at the same time coach knows what’s best. What’s best for the team right now is Jeremy being out there as the starting quarterback. But I’ll be right there behind him ready to go.” Auburn Tigers quarterback Jeremy Johnson (6) talks to Auburn Tigers quarterback Sean White (13) after the NCAA football game between LSU Tigers and Auburn on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015, at Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge, La. LSU Tigers defeated Auburn Tigers 45-21. Albert Cesare / AdvertiserAuburn Tigers quarterback Jeremy Johnson (6) talks to Auburn Tigers quarterback Sean White (13) after the NCAA football game between LSU Tigers and Auburn on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015, at Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge, La. LSU Tigers defeated Auburn Tigers 45-21. Albert Cesare / AdvertiserPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%0:00 Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window. The Video Cloud video was not found. Error Code: VIDEO_CLOUD_ERR_VIDEO_NOT_FOUNDlast_img read more

Report: Rousseff to skip FIFA Congress

first_imgThe head of state or head of government traditionally addresses the meeting.The newspaper cited unnamed sources at the presidential palaces.FIFA has criticized Brazil over the last few years for delays in building World Cup stadiums and related road and airport projects.Rousseff is running for re-election in October, and lavish spending on the World Cup and the 2016 Rio Olympics is unpopular with many in the country. Many Brazilians resent FIFA for making financial demands, though it pays few taxes in the country.The paper said Sports Minister Aldo Rebelo would replace Rousseff who has promised — despite poor preparations — that this will be the “Cup of Cups.”In another sign of the disquiet surrounding the World Cup, neither Rousseff nor FIFA President Sepp Blatter will speak at Thursday’s opening match in Sao Paulo between Brazil and Croatia. They were jeered at the opening of the Confederations Cup a year ago.FIFA’s general secretary Jerome Valcke angered Brazilians two years ago when he said the country needed a “kick in the backside” to get construction moving.Brazil is spending about $11.5 billion on the World Cup, about $4 billion of it to build or renovate 12 stadiums. Four of those are expected to become white elephants.The lavish spending became a target of protests at the Confederations Cup — a warm-up for the World Cup. Daily demonstrations were met with tear gas and rubber bullets, and tear gas wafted into the Maracana stadium in Rio during the final between Brazil and defending World Cup champion Spain.Brazil is deploying almost 200,000 soldiers and police around the country this time, bracing for more demonstrations with many citizens lukewarm about the tournament, and similarly aprehenisive about spending on the 2016 Olympic in Rio de Janeiro.Spending there has reached $17 billion — a mix of public and private money — with the costs sure to rise.Rousseff is still the favorite for re-election, but her poll numbers are falling. A recent Pew survey found 61 percent of Brazilians opposed to holding the World Cup.last_img read more

Weightlifting team set for Barbados competition

first_imgA THREE-member team, selected to represent Guyana Amateur Weightlifting Association, will wing out this afternoon to compete in the Phillips and Springer Classic Caribbean Championships, which is scheduled for Bridgetown, Barbados later this week.Krystol Chanderban and Deion Nurse will look to replicate their performance when the two-day weightlifting event gets underway tomorrow. Chanderban was adjudged the best Junior female lifter, while Nurse was declared the best overall lifter in the Masters category one year ago.With only two lifters set to compete this year, the national team will not be able to repeat their 2017 performance, which saw Guyana win three gold medals, one silver medal and one bronze.According to Nurse, who is the technical director of the local association, he is hopeful for a good performance.“There are never any guarantees. However, I’m very optimistic.”Up to a few weeks ago, a few other lifters were contemplating making the trip, but according to Nurse, commitment to work and studies shortened the numbers.The other person in the travelling squad is coach Sean Cozier.last_img read more

Kentucky takes on tackling issues

first_imgAs one might expect — and Cats fans surely hope — the coaching staff has put a premium on sound tackling and stuffing the run this week at practice. UK’s last two opponents, LSU and Mississippi State, have rushed for 303 and 326 yards, respectively.“The big thing we need to do is the same thing I’ve been talking about week after week: A lot of things come down to fundamentally getting better,” Kentucky coach Mark Stoops said. “That’s something that really bothers me, because it’s something I take great pride in as we continue to push forward and develop this program. We need to be a better fundamental football team.“As a defensive coach and as a defensive guy, you’re never proud of those moments when you miss three, four, five tackles in one play. It’s not what you’re looking for.”RELATED: Kentucky wonders which Tigers’ team they’ll seeRELATED: Pressure on for Cats to secure bowl berthBulldogs quarterback Dak Prescott and tailback Josh Robinson made several UK defenders miss last week and, accordingly, the Cats made ESPN’s highlight reel for all the wrong reasons. Defensive coordinator D.J. Eliot said UK has since “hyped it up” with tackling in practice.“You gotta get a good swarm of guys to the ball,” Eliot said. “So when that first guy kind of hits him and wraps him up, if he doesn’t get him down, there’s somebody else to bring him down.”Dupree called it “embarrassing” to watch replays of Prescott and Robinson bouncing off, spinning away from or running by the Wildcats’ defense. He can’t count the number of times he’s already heard the word “fundamental” this week.“They say ‘fundamental’ every day. All of us know,” defnesive end Bud Dupree said. “If your shoe string’s not tied the right way, in a fundamental way, then they tie it in the fundamental way.”Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%0:00 Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window. The Video Cloud video was not found. Error Code: VIDEO_CLOUD_ERR_VIDEO_NOT_FOUND Session ID: 2020-09-17:4aa9c655f069de578a56da3f Player ID: videojs-brightcove-player-311179-3865787026001 OK Close Modal DialogCaption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.last_img read more

Social esports platform Taunt raises $3 million in seed funding

first_imgSeattle based startup Taunt has announced it has closed $3m (£2.2m) in seed financing.The funding was led by Foundry Group, other investors include Pioneer Square Labs’ venture arm PSL Ventures, the startup studio which founded Taunt, Vulcan Capital and esports industry investor CRCM Ventures.Taunt is a social platform for esports fans. Users will compete with each other by voting on important match events such as objective control, the outcome of the game and a variety of other conditions and statistics. Example of Taunt voting layoutJon David, CEO of Taunt had this to say: “We’re building a fresh and exciting way for esports fans to watch their favourite matches, teams, and players with their friends. Fans can predict match events, answer live challenges, and brag about their victories. Traditional sports fans have so many options for rich, engaging social interactions. We’re bringing that depth to esports with Taunt.”Jon David was the Executive Producer at PopCap, working on their popular franchises Bejeweled and Plants VS. Zombies.Brad Feld, Foundry Group Managing Director and Taunt board member spoke about esports’ massive growth: “At the rate this industry is accelerating, it’s becoming clear that there’s a need for a more thoughtful social layer on top of the viewing experience.Matt Lee, Managing Partner at CRCM Ventures: “Taunt is a fun and interactive way to watch esports with your friends or by yourself. Communities of highly engaged users will form around Taunt’s platform, extending the ability for fans to get involved with the games, teams, and pro players.”The Taunt App is due for full release later this summer.Esports Insider says: Taunt has a big opportunity to catch a market that is clearly available, fans love sharing their opinion on what’s going on during a live event so allowing them to vote live with other fans is a smart move.Sign up to our newsletter!last_img read more

US dominate short distance field events at Grand Prix

first_imgAthletes from the United States (US) emerged winners in most of the short distance track events at the rLG Ghana Grand Prix held at the Baba Yara Sports Stadium in Kumasi on Saturday.The competition, which was Ghana’s first ever international track and field athletics event, saw the US finished in dramatic fashion to win gold in the Men and women’s 100 metres races, as well as the 100 metres hurdles races.In the Men’s 100 metres event, America’s Terrel Wilks maintained the lead right after the gunshot and coasted home to a time of 10.28 seconds to place first, followed by Jamaica’s Oshane Bailey, who placed second with a time of 10.32 seconds and Emmanuel Appiah-Kubi of Ghana placed third with a time of 10.42 seconds.In the 200 metres event, Bailey placed first by recording a time of 20.87 seconds, Wilks placed second with a time of 20.89 seconds and Ghana’s Shepherd Agbeko took the third position with a time of 20.92 seconds.In the Women’s 100 metres race, Tianna Madison of US, clocked a time of 11.74 seconds to place first; Ghana’s duo of Beatrice Gyaman and Flings Owusu-Agyapong took the second and third positions with 11.95 and 12.07 seconds respectively.In the 100 metres hurdles Nichole Denby of US recorded a time of 13.17 seconds to take the first position, Jessica Ohanaja of Nigeria placed second by clocking 13.53 seconds, whilst Ghana’s Margaret Simpson took the third position with a time of 13.59 seconds. In the Men’s 3,000 metres race, Willy Rotish of Kenya placed first with 8.01.67 seconds, Uganda’s Ben Siwa placed second with a time of 8.02.82 seconds and Mohammed Kasim of Ghana took the third position with 8.38.51 seconds.The 1,500 Women’s event was an all Ghana affair as Rita Luonab, Naomi Serwaah and Lydia Afia Atta placed first, second and third with a time of 4.42.88 seconds, 4.43.00 seconds and 4.48.00 seconds, respectively.In the Men’s 4×100 relay, Ghana clocked 38.92 seconds to place first, the International Select Team placed second by recording 39.66 seconds while Burkina Faso took the third position with 40.56 seconds.In the Women’s event, Ghana emerged winners by recording a time of 44.04 seconds, Burkina Faso and Ashanti Region placed second and third with 46.18 seconds and 47:34 seconds, respectively.The Men’s Long Jump event was won by Luvo Manyonga of South Africa with 8.05 metres, Ignatius Gaisah placed second with 8.03 metres while Jarod Tobler of US took the third position by recording 8.01 metres. In the Women’s event, Comfort Onyali of Nigeria and Yetsa Tuakli-Wosornu of US tied at the first position by recording 6.29 metres each, while South Africa’s Janice Josephs took the second position with 6.26 metres.The Shot Putt event was won by Charles Jordaan of South Africa with 18:40 metres, Nigeria’s Kenechukwu Ezeafor placed second with 15:94 metres and Kwabena Keene of Ghana recorded 15:74 metres to take the third position.last_img read more

Sharp, Brimley, Lee tie for top honors at Rose Park Open

first_imgSALT LAKE CITY — Two amateurs and a professional tied for top honors at the Rose Park Open at Rose Park Golf Course.Ryan Brimley, CJ Lee and GolfLab teaching professional Tommy Sharp all shot 6-under-par 65s, a shot ahead of six other golfers. Sharp earned $1,350 for his victory.Seven golfers, amateurs Nicklaus Britt, Steven Croft, Dan Horner, Mitchell Schow and John Reid, came in at 66 along with Riverside CC pro Matt Baird and Shawn Edwards.Former champion Henry White was the low senior with a 67. Lester Perry won the first flight with a 69 and Chris Smith earned low net honors with a net 64.ROSE PARK OPENRose Park Golf Course par-71a- denotes amateur65 — Tommy Sharp, a-Ryan Brimley, a-CJ Lee66 — Matt Baird, Shawn Edwards, a-Steven Croft, a-Mitchell Schow, a-Dan Horner, a-Nicklaus Britt, a-John Reid67 — Chris Moody, Zach Johnson, Dan Engle, a-Ben Schillerman, a-Patrick Fishburn, a-J.T. Timmons68 — a-Jordan Rogers, a-Kelsey Chugg, a-Kurt Owen, a-Kirk Nielson, a-Naomi Soifua, a-Preston Alder, a-Cameron CrawfordSenior pros67 — Henry White70 — Ron Branca, Dave DeSantisFirst flight winner — Lester Perry, 69Net winner — Chris Smith, 64last_img read more

Pianist and psychiatrist breaks down Gershwin in verse and behavior at…

first_img Concert pianist and psychiatrist Richard Kogan plays “Rhapsody in Blue”, Sept. 19 at Anschutz Medical Campus. Kogan offered insights into the life of composer George Gershwin during a presentation that included lecture and live music. (Marla R. Keown/Aurora Sentinel) Concert pianist and psychiatrist Richard Kogan addresses his audience, Sept. 19 at Anschutz Medical Campus. Kogan offered insights into the life of composer George Gershwin during a presentation that included lecture and live music. (Marla R. Keown/Aurora Sentinel) Concert pianist and psychiatrist Richard Kogan plays “Rhapsody in Blue”, Sept. 19 at Anschutz Medical Campus. Kogan offered insights into the life of composer George Gershwin during a presentation that included lecture and live music. (Marla R. Keown/Aurora Sentinel) AURORA | George Gershwin was a troublemaker, a thief who’d steal from pushcarts and a bully who’d pick fights with the other kids in the neighborhood.If he’d grown up in the early decades of the 21st century, the composer of jazz standards like “Summertime” and orchestral works like “Rhapsody in Blue” could have easily been diagnosed with some kind of conduct disorder. It’s the kind of verdict that could carry a prescription for any number of psychotropic drugs, treatments like ritalin and adderall designed to retool the chemistry of the brain. But Gershwin, born in 1898, didn’t have access to that kind of medicine. The streets of Brooklyn were his childhood playground; they turned him tough as his impoverished family moved from dilapidated apartment to dilapidated apartment in the early 1900s.“Gershwin could have gone off the rails,” Richard Kogan told a rapt audience during a dual lecture and piano performance at the Anschutz Medical Campus on Sept. 19. Kogan spoke with plenty of expertise — in addition to his credits as an accomplished concert pianist, he’s a clinical professor of psychiatry at the Weill Cornell Medical College and co-director of the center’s Human Sexuality Program. “Even his parents predicted that he would grow up to be a bum.”Kogan went on to illustrate just how wrong that prediction turned out to be during the lecture and concert, part of the University of Colorado Center for Bioethics and Humanities’ new Music and Medicine Initiative. Kagan’s guest appearance on campus came as the Center for Bioethics and Humanities looks to expand its programming beyond the revolving exhibitions at the Fulginiti Pavilion that opened last year.“I think this let people know that this music and medicine initiative is under way, to explore the healing properties of music,” said Tess Jones, the director of the Arts and Humanities in Healthcare Program and the interim director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities. That initiative includes an on-campus choir and orchestra performances. “Our hope is that it will whet people’s appetites and get them to participate or come out and enjoy the incredible musical talent that’s part of our population on campus.”As the artistic director of the Weill Cornell Music and Medicine program, Kogan has made his own efforts to create conceptual ties between the two disciplines. During his presentation at Anschutz, he explained how the ancient Greeks designated Apollo as the god of both music and medicine. He spoke of ancient shamans who were healers and artists in equal measure. He spoke again and again of “music’s capacity to transform young people’s lives.“Over time, music and medicine split apart,” Kagan said. “Each of these disciplines have become increasingly specialized.”But for a young Gershwin who spent his time getting into trouble on the streets of Brooklyn, the distance between those two schools of thought wasn’t that far. A friend’s violin recital proved to be the most effective kind of prescription for Gershwin’s early behavioral problems. At age 10, Gershwin found salvation in the simple notes, chords and rhythm; he stumbled on to a treatment that would ultimately lead to fame, fortune and the undisputed title of one of the greatest composers of the 20th century.“As soon as he heard those first notes, Gershwin was so transfixed, on the spot (he) decided to devote the rest of his life to the study of music,” Kogan said. “He made a remarkable recovery.”From there, Gershwin turned all of his frenetic, nervous energy to his art. He started learning the piano obsessively. He quit school at the age of 15 to be a “song-plugger” in the Tin Pan Alley neighborhood of New York, promoting sheet music for a large publishing company and working on his own music in his spare time. Collaborating with his brother Ira, George Gershwin pumped out tune after tune, obsessively working to perfect his craft. Full-blown commercial success came after Broadway crooner Al Jolson performed Gershwin’s song “Swanee” in 1919. That exposure was the first step in making Gershwin a household name.“He completely inhaled the jazz tradition,” Kogan said. “Before he was skilled, he was actually convinced he was great.”More enduring artistic achievements followed. Gershwin’s 1924 classical work “Rhapsody in Blue” came to define the sound of American music. His opera “Porgy and Bess,” composed in 1935, started as a commercial flop. It was only after Gershwin’s death from a brain tumor at age 38 that the show would achieve status as one of the greatest orchestral works of the 20th century.Kogan brought Gershwin’s story to life through words and notes. A graduate of the Julliard School of Music Pre-College program, Kogan took breaks from his lecture to play solo and sweeping renditions of selections from “Porgy and Bess,” “Rhapsody in Blue” and standards like “Someone to Watch Over Me” and “Swanee.” He spoke of Gershwin’s struggles with depression in his 30s, of the role that music played in keeping his focus. Even as he suffered from the undiagnosed brain tumor that eventually killed him, music remained the main focus of Gershwin’s life. He made good on his decision to give his life to the art form.“It’s one of the great tragedies of recent history,” Kogan said in reference to the years and years of bad diagnoses as the brain tumor made its fatal progress. “It boggles the mind to imagine what he might have produced.”But the larger message of Kogan’s lecture was clear: a greater tragedy would have come if that 10-year-old ruffian raised on the streets of Brooklyn had never discovered music. With song credits that number in the hundreds and a cultural impact far too great to measure, Gershwin made the most of the medicinal quality of music. It was a drug more powerful than ritalin or adderall; it was a treatment that left a permanent mark on the world.Reach reporter Adam Goldstein at 720-449-9707 or agoldstein@aurorasentinel.com Concert pianist and psychiatrist Richard Kogan addresses his audience, Sept. 19 at Anschutz Medical Campus. Kogan offered insights into the life of composer George Gershwin during a presentation that included lecture and live music. (Marla R. Keown/Aurora Sentinel) Concert pianist and psychiatrist Richard Kogan plays “Rhapsody in Blue”, Sept. 19 at Anschutz Medical Campus. Kogan offered insights into the life of composer George Gershwin during a presentation that included lecture and live music. (Marla R. Keown/Aurora Sentinel)last_img read more

BBC: Unai Emery to replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal

first_imgAccording to the BBC, the vacancy left by Arsene Wenger at Arsenal now has someone to fill it. The British outlet reports that Unai Emery will be the man to take over at the London club.  CEST Emery was coach of Paris Saint-Germain for the last two seasons where he was taked with winning the Champions League. But after falling short both times, beaten by Barcelona and Real Madrid, he has been replaced by Thomas Tuchel.  sport.es 21/05/2018 BBC: Unai Emery, nuevo entrenador del Arsenal Upd. at 23:03 Several names have been linked with the job, such as Massimiliano Allegri, Patrick Vieira, Luis Enrique and Mikel Arteta, Pep Guardiola’s assistant. However, it’s Emery who is set to take charge.  IN SPORT.ES The BBC add that Emery is not totally fluent in English, but that will not stop him getting the job. There could be an official announcement as early as Tuesday.  Before coaching PSG, Emery worked at, among other clubs, Sevilla, Spartak Moscow and Valencia.last_img read more

Investing in wind

first_imgBy Melissa MeehanThe Garfield resident says the windy town could soon be making money from putting energy back into the…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img