LCT3’s World Premiere Play Luce, Starring Marin Hinkle & Neal Huff, Officially Opens Off-Broadway

first_img View Comments In addition to Huff, Hinkle and Onaodowan, the cast of Luce features Olivia Oguma and Sharon Washington. Luce tells the story of Amy (Hinkle) and Peter (Huff), who think they’ve adopted the perfect son in Luce (Onaodowan). But when a teacher makes an alarming discovery during a locker search at the school, Amy and Peter are forced to reckon with their idealized image of their son, adopted years ago from a war-torn African country. Related Shows Luce Show Closed This production ended its run on Nov. 17, 2013 The creative team for Luce includes scenic design by Timothy R. Mackabee, costume design by Kaye Voyce, lighting design by Tyler Micoleau and sound design by Jill BC Du Boff. LCT3 is a programming initiative devoted to producing the work of new artists as well as developing new audiences. Neal Huff, Marin Hinkle and Okieriete Onaodowan star in the LCT3 world premiere of JC Lee’s Luce, which officially opens October 21 at the Claire Tow Theater. Directed by May Adrales, Luce, about an all-star high school student with a dangerous secret, will play a limited engagement through November 17 at the off-Broadway theater.last_img read more

Vermont Moose Permit Lottery results are in

first_imgSHELDONVTD2 WASHINGTONVTJ2 EAST BARREVTJ1 CRAFTSBURY COMMONVTD1 RANDOLPHVTD1 SOUTH HEROVTB&C OLIVIAIST. JAMES ZACHARYRPERRY WILLIAMSTOWNVTH ISAACWMERRIAM DYLANRHARLOW CHITTENANGONYE1 SPRINGFIELDVTD2 BAILEY COLCHESTERVTG MONTPELIERVTG RICHARDSLEIGH WESTMINSTERVTM&O CLIFFORDCCLARK MONTPELIERVTH EDWARDJLONGWAY EDENVTB&C JOHNJCOMPANION BERLINNHE1 EAST MIDDLEBURYVTE2 ERIC TIMOTHY ALBANYVTD1 KRIS ANTHONYACLARK MANCHESTER CENTERVTD1 SHELDONVTE1 IRASBURGVTD1 NICHOLASSROWE COMSTOCK JOHNFMCCABE III LEGGETT KARLAGARDNER MILTONPMCWAYNE SOUTH BURLINGTONVTB&C GROTONVTG,H,I,J1,J2,L,M,O,P or Q ALBERTWST CYR DANIELLPREHEMO CHATHAMNYG,H,I,J1,J2,L,M,O,P or Q CAMBRIDGEVTE1 DAVIDRROBILLARD BRIANMBILODEAU VICKYRQUENNEVILLE JOHNSONVTB&C LEVESQUE DAVIDPWIMETT COLINCLUMBRA MARIABJACOBS DAVIDRLAMBERT FAIRFAXVTE1 MORETOWNVTG DORSETVTD2 BURLINGTONVTP&Q RICHFORDVTB&C LEEESTOODLEY CONCORDNHE1 TAMMYMMILLER STEVENTCROSBY BRAINTREEVTE1 MASURE NEWARKVTD2 JAMES JAMIESBOYER BRAINTREEVTB&C LINCOLNVTI RICHFORDVTB&C BRIDGEWATERVTM&O WESLEYACHANDLER RANDOLPHVTJ1 GUILFORDVTE1 NORTH TROYVTE2 VALRLAMONDA DUBLINNHB&C ESSEX JCTVTE1 FRANKLINVTB&C COLCHESTERVTB&C LAWRENCEPBERGERON ROCHESTERVTJ1 ESSEX JUNCTIONVTM&O FLORENCEVTG,H,I,J1,J2,L,M,O,P or Q CAROLYNEJHEBERT ADAMDBRAMAN ROBERTLBINGHAM RUTLANDVTD1 WILLIAMCBURTON PLAINFIELDVTH ALLENJBEAULIEU STARKSBOROVTI EAST BARREVTD1 NEWPORTVTB&C CEDRUSNHANNAN ISLAND PONDVTE1 NEWPORT CTRVTE2 BRANDONVTH NATHANJREIL MONTYPVACHON SHELBURNEVTJ1 GROTONVTD1 MONTPELIERVTD1 JENNAMSPRAGUE MATTHEWJHOCK RAYMONDSHALL KEVINQKING ARLINGTONVTD2 WOODBURYVTH BENNINGTONVTM&O MARKALEONARD ISLAND PONDVTD1 CRAIGAWILLIAMS DANAAJOYAL LISAAINGALLS BRIANRPIERCEJR.MIDDLETOWN SPRINGSVTE1 NEWPORTVTE1 DANIEL LISAMJACOBS DERBY LINEVTD2 WHITE RIVER JUNCTIONVTI ROUX BRYANLBENNETT BRUCE MARKAHIPES JOHNSONVTB&C PROVOST READINGPAD2 WINDSORVTD1 LEONARDJGERARDI TRAVISAGODFREY HOWARDRBEAUPRESR.MILTONVTB&C COLBYJGIROUX SHIRLEY ESSEX JUNCTIONVTJ1 STARKSBOROVTG,H,I,J1,J2,L,M,O,P or Q SOUTH HEROVTE2 THOMASHBROOKS BRANDONVTG,H,I,J1,J2,L,M,O,P or Q EAST HAVENVTE2 RICHMONDVTB&C FRANKLINVTB&C JAMEYCBURBO DAVID WILLISTONVTD2 MITCHELLHBARROWS TODDRCALEVRO JAMESBDESANTOS MORGANVTE1 WATERBURYVTG,H,I,J1,J2,L,M,O,P or Q ROBERTAACABBO BROOKFIELDVTJ2 SO ROYALTONVTB&C JOSHUASCARON BELLOWS FALLSVTJ2 GARYLCARTER CONNIEJKING ERICMRAINVILLE DAVIDJGUILMETTE MICHAEL GORDON ANDRE SPRINGFIELDVTE1 MORGANJGOUVEIA MICHAELRMILLER HYDE PARKVTD1 DELBERT SCOTTMCASTINE BUCHANAN BARREVTH MILTONVTB&C VERGENNESVTI CAMBRIDGEVTE1 ST. JOHNSBURYVTE1 FIRST NAMEMILAST NAMESUFFIXCITYSTATEWMUREGULAR PERMITVETERAN PERMITARCHERY PERMITCHADABROWN BARREVTE2 ASHLANDMAE1 CONNORTWALKER KENNETHECURTIS SOUTH ROYALTONVTD1 MATTHEWHGRAZIANO THOMASWWILLIAMS Vermont Business Magazine The winners of Vermont’s 2015 moose hunting permits were determined Thursday, July 16, at a lottery drawing in Barre. Governor Peter Shumlin, standing alongside Fish & Wildlife Commissioner Louis Porter, started the computer-generated selection process that randomly picked 265 winners from more than 9,500 lottery applicants. The drawing is done by a random sort of applications that were submitted by a June 17, 2015 deadline. As part of the regular lottery drawing, a “special priority drawing” was held for five permits to go to applicants who have received, or are eligible to receive, a Campaign Ribbon for Operation Iraqi Freedom or Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. The unsuccessful applicants from the Iraqi-Afghanistan drawing were included in the larger regular drawing that followed. All applicants for both drawings who did not receive a permit were awarded a bonus point to improve their chances in future moose permit lotteries.The lottery was held for 40 moose permits to be used in the Vermont’s October 1-7 archery moose hunting season and 225 moose permits for the October 17-22 regular moose season. “Today’s lottery drawing helps celebrate one of Vermont’s successes in science-based wildlife management,” said State Wildlife Biologist Cedric Alexander.  “Vermont’s first moose hunt was in 1993, when 25 moose were taken with 30 permits issued.  We expect close to 120 moose will be taken this fall in a carefully regulated hunt.”Winners in this year’s moose hunting lottery are posted in a searchable database on the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department’s website (www.vtfishandwildlife.com(link is external)). If your name wasn’t drawn, you can still bid in Vermont’s auction for five moose hunting permits, which is open until August 13. Sealed bids must be received by Vermont Fish & Wildlife by 4:30 p.m. that day.  Contact the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department to receive a moose permit bid kit. Telephone 802-828-1190 or email cheri.waters@state.vt.us(link sends e-mail). Vermont has about 2,400 moose statewide with the greatest concentration in the Northeast Kingdom.  Photo:  VTF&W photo by Steve Schaefer. Kevin Rice of South Pomfret, VT with the archery record 919 lb. bull moose he took last year during Vermont’s archery moose hunt.  All winning applicants will receive a winner’s packet in the mail. Winner’s packets were mailed to all winners on July 16, 2015.Completed forms must be returned to Fish & Wildlife no later than Monday, August 3, 2015.If you decide to decline your permit and receive a bonus point instead, please do so in writing and return it in the self-addressed envelope in your winner’s packet before August 3, 2015 or email to cheri.waters@state.vt.us(link sends e-mail). Any questions, please contact our licensing division at 802-828-1190.Winners of moose permits for this year are below: PITTSFORDVTE1 E HARDWICKVTD2 EASTMAN JERICHOVTB&C RUTLANDVTG,H,I,J1,J2,L,M,O,P or Q HARDWICKVTD1 RYANJDUFRESNE ROBERTPJETTE SOUTH ROYALTONVTD1 WHITE RIVER JUNCTIONVTE1 FAIRFAXVTD1 DUMMERSTONVTE1 NEWFANEVTM&O FERRISBURGHVTD2 DEBORAHAGREEN SWANTONVTD1 ST ALBANSVTE2 STRAFFORDVTJ2 ST. JOHNSBURYVTJ2 WORCESTERVTH DRAGON EAST MIDDLEBURYVTE2 READINGVTH ADAM GUILDHALLVTD2 GLASTONBURYCTD1 CHELSEAVTE1 SOUTH BURLINGTONVTB&C ROBERT MARSHFIELDVTH ROBERTVHARNOIS MATTHEWDRAFUS GREENSBORO BENDVTE1 BENNINGTONVTL FETTERS HULL JAMESMWETHERBY JOHNSTON AUDREYAMALONEY JOHNAZARTARIAN PAULNKIK MATTHEWNTETREAULT DANNYMDOYLE LONGWAY DENNISGRODGER HIGHGATE CENTERVTB&C GARY RICHMONDVTG REED RICHARDAAMSDEN JAMESRMYERS WESTFORDVTL WINDSORVTE2 MOLLYMMITCHELL JEFFERSONVILLEVTD1 HYDE PARKVTD1 BENNINGTONVTP&Q FRANKLINVTM&O ST.ALBANSVTD2 MICHAELRALLARD ANTHONYBWHITAKER ROBERTRSHORTSLEEVE LARRYLSHEPARD, JR DANNYLGONYAW ALDENMGROUT CAMBER MIDDLESEXVTH GUETTI VERNONVTM&O MELISSASBOVEY BENSONVTG,H,I,J1,J2,L,M,O,P or Q MARYANNE DAVIDPWILLEY BLAIRTMOULTON OWENLASTBURY MORRISVILLEVTE2 QUEENSBURYNYD1 DENNISRSMITH BERNARD BRANDONVTE1 WESTFIELDVTB&C MOORESRLYNDONVILLEVTE1 SAINT JOHNSBURYVTD1 RICHFORDVTB&C DAVIDWTATROJRFRANKLINVTG,H,I,J1,J2,L,M,O,P or Q BARNETVTE2 ALFREDPOSIAS CROSBYMSARGEANT CHADMLANTAGNE WAUSAUWIM&O GEORGIAVTJ1 SPENCERJHOWARD SAINT ALBANSVTB&C JOHN RICHMONDVTE1 TIMOTHYEROBERTS RICHFORDVTH ROBERTCSCARBOROUGH MONTGOMERY CENTERVTD1 WEST CHARLESTONVTE1center_img RICHARDJZIOBRON JAREDDLAMARCHE CAMBRIDGEVTD2 PAULWHAYNES FRANCISPJENNINGS CHELSEAVTE1 MARKAGRISWOLD JASONMBRISSON WILLIAMHJENNISON HARDWICKVTI ZACHARYFSUDDABY JAMESAMARCHALAND ALBURGHVTE1 BRYANGWHITE WATERBURYVTI LONDONDERRYVTL FAIRFIELDVTE1 NICHOLASBCAMERON POULTNEYVTE1 MAYHEW BRUCEROLDENBURG CONLEY KINCAID BRIDGEWATER CORNERSVTM&O AARONJKING QUATT HALEYJTETREAULT JAMAICAVTE1 KEVIN FREDHVANCE JOHNDKIPP JAMESWPATCH NANCYLKOLESNIK POULTNEYVTD2 WESTFORDVTE1 TUNBRIDGEVTJ1 TIMOTHYPPALMER COLRAINMAI MONTGOMERYVTB&C BELLINGHAMMAH EUGENE IRASBURGVTD1 GARRETTJLAPERLE RANDOLP CENTERVTD2 DANA HINESBURGVTE2 WHITE RIVER JUNCTIONVTP&Q SOUTH BURLINGTONVTB&C BRAYTON RAYMONDCJETTE COLCHESTERVTD2 EAST MONTPELIERVTH SUMMERHILLPAJ1 SOUTH BARREVTE2 MILTONVTE1 HELLERTOWNPAE2 HYDEPARK VT.VTB&C BRIANDLEPINE BENSONVTG,H,I,J1,J2,L,M,O,P or Q DENNISRLOHREY ERICVJOHNSON WEST CHARLESTONVTD1 GEORGEEFIFIELD PERKINSVILLEVTM&O JAMESRLOGAN JAYVTE1 DANNYRWHITAKER JOANNAWATERHOUSE EAST DOVERVTP&Q BERNADETTEACOUTURE JAMESWGRINTER STUARTJDELIDUKA MARKEPOLLARD ROBERT BRIDGEWATER CORNERSVTM&O RICKYRSTOCKER PITTSFORDVTD1 LORENAHOGABOOM WEST WARDSBOROVTP&Q JAYCDEBONO MARCELLWPUTVAIN PUTNAM RAYMOND RUTLANDVTE2 E MONTPELIERVTM&O SOUTH BURLINGTONVTB&C BOOSKA HINESBURGVTD1 LAWRENCEEBEACH WOODSTOCKVTM&O MICHAELRCHARNEY EDENVTB&C RICHARDPPAUL LEONARD TIMOTHYPMURPHY DENISJMARCHEGIANI JOSHUADMCDONOUGH BRANDONVTI DWAYNE MCLEAN ANNEDSMITH CLARKSBURGMAP&Q KEVINJLOUZIER PHILIPFLENZ EAST HARDWICKVTD2 JAMISON SOUTH BURLINGTONVTE1 REBECCASROCHFORD HARDWICKVTE1 PLAINFIELDVTH JACOBMLINCOURT GREENSBORO BENDVTD2 TYLERJBATCHELDER NANCYLDEROSIA LINDAASTOWELL QUENNEVILLE JEFFERSONVILLEVTD1 HANCOCKVTI GUILFORDVTI RYANWPYTKO DANVILLEVTD2 CHARLES MATTHEWJGONYO ST. JOHNSBURYVTD2 EDWARDDEVANS BARREVTJ2 CORNWALLVTI KENNETHEBOYCE TREMBLAY ROBIN DUPUIS SUDBURYVTI JENISONMIB&C JEREMYWKING BRUCEHCRAM N SPRINGFIELDVTE1 JASONWMEARS JONE BENNINGTONVTP&Q LYNNETTEADEAETTE CASTLETONVTD2 PAULAMASCITTI GILMANVTJ2 TIMOTHY JEFFREYSFRENCH DRENNENWVB&C BENQADAMS E. DUMMERSTONVTD2 MANCHESTERMAG,H,I,J1,J2,L,M,O,P or Q DAVIDJBLACK QUINNEMARTIN HARTLANDVTM&O SHAWNGMESSIER DEREKACYPHER JAMESPSMITHJRWILLISTONVTE1 DIANELSHEPARD MARTIN JORDANTQUILLIAM MILTONVTE1 HAILEY VIRGINIAAGARRISON STEPHENMDAVIS JOHNWWAGNER CHARLOTTEVTG MCCARTHY SWANTONVTE1 PETERRBREEN CORYSCURTIS DOMPIERRE ROBERTWLENCKE JOHNPEVANS GEORGEWGOLDSWORTHY EAST HAVENVTE2 JAMESBREYNOLDS ROCHESTERVTJ1 RALPH JODYLNELSON EMERSON JESSICA SHELDONVTB&C HITT BRISTOLVTI WILLIAMTOWNVTD1 DAVIDJTATRO NEWPORTVTB&C ERICHPILKINGTON ANTHONYSPOTTER POND RYANGKESSLER LANCEESAWYER JEFFREYDLEGGIO ROBERTLSAWYER MICHAELEBOUCHER MICHELI BRANDONVTI MELISSAAMOFFATT BURLINGTONVTI MATTHEWJSHERWIN MONTGOMERY CENTERVTD1 DANIELOWHITE SCOTTKCOONS RANDOLPHVTM&O VICTORAATKINS VICTORPGAUDETTE SHORT ANDESNYD2 ORWELLVTE1 CUTTINGSVILLEVTL MICHAELJDESLANDES CHESTERVTM&O STEPHENGWALCOTT DAHANKMOHAMED SWANTONVTH GRAND ISLEVTB&C RICHFORDVTB&C BRIDGEWATERVTM&O BRIDGEWATER CORNERSVTM&O SALVADOR SCOTTARAWSON DIANEEOTIS WATERBURY CENTERVTJ1 POULTNEYVTM&O WHITE RIVER JCTVTE1 CRAFTSBURYVTD1 OAKDALENYH MORETOWNVTJ2 HARDWICKVTE1 VALERIEFVALLERAND LYNDONVILLEVTE2 ST JOHNSBURYVTD1 JESSEASPINA STAMFORDVTP&Q SHANEMCLARKE SHAFTSBURYVTP&Q ESSEX JCTVTB&C HINESBURGVTD2 SANDRALTHOMAS SHREWSBURYVTL WEST CHARLESTONVTD1 WALTERTTROESCHER REDWOODNYD1 TOUSANT HALL CROSS FAIRFAXVTE1 BARRE TOWNVTH MARIONESHELDRICK THOMASAHENDERSON GROTONVTH JEFF RUTLANDVTG,H,I,J1,J2,L,M,O,P or Q BRIANLBOUCHARD ZACHARY ORSONJHITCHCOCK SILBERTRLANOUE JR. LAKE ELMOREVTH JAMES WILLIAMTMEIGS WHITINGHAMVTP&Q JAMESFKASUBA JAMESEWESCOM LAWRENCEGLYNDS ST. JOHNSBURYVTJ2 MARKCMOORE KYLEWDEMERITT EAST CALAISVTE2 TUCKER BARBARA CHRISTOPHERTSTEVENS MICHAELSJACOBS POST MILLSVTD1 SANDRASOBRIEN RICHARDAWILBUR III WINOOSKIVTH PLYMOUTHVTM&O ISLAND PONDVTE1 JESSICAEWOOD JORDANIWHITE MICHAELJLAVALETTE PLYMOUTHMAJ2 HAROLD SHEFFIELDVTD2last_img read more

Life Time Fitness Q3 2012 shows a ‘Healthy Way of Life’

first_img Related Life Time Fitness Inc, ‘The Healthy Way of Life Company’, has today reported its financial results for the third quarter ended 30 September 2012.Third quarter 2012 revenue grew 11.1% to US$294.9 million.Total revenue for the first nine months of 2012 grew 11.7% to US$851.6 million.Net income for the quarter was US$32.1 million, or US$0.77 per diluted share; compared to net income of US$27.0 million, or US$0.66 per diluted share, for Q3 2011.Net income for the first nine months of 2012 was US$88.1 million, or US$2.10 per diluted share; compared to net income of US$72.8 million, or US$1.78 per diluted share, for the prior-year period.“We saw continued earnings growth, cash flow and margin improvement in the third quarter, and are pleased with our revenue metrics, which were highlighted by double-digit growth in total revenue and in-centre revenue,” said Bahram Akradi, Life Time Chairman, President and CEO.“We remain focused on building our Healthy Way of Life brand by making strategic investments in programs and services that we see as powerful opportunities to enhance our members’ experience, while driving membership acquisition and retention. Our business model is strong, and we are steadfast in our focus on driving long-term growth and success.”Earlier this month Life Time made a commitment to reverse the destructive state of health, and poor levels of nutrition, in the US. Life Time has set out to influence a healthier nation with Commitment Day, a new initiative under way in early 2013.The gym operator and events business has raised the stakes in tackling health issues and is on a mission to ‘drive the way we all think about healthier living.’Life Time has a diverse portfolio – with a range of distinctive and large sports, professional fitness, family recreation and spa destinations. Today, the company operates 105 centres under the LIFE TIME FITNESS and LIFE TIME ATHLETIC brands in the United States and Canada.The company also organises the Life Time Tri and Race to the Toyota Cup Series. Earlier this year,Life Time acquired CEO Challenges, the leading player in organising multisport competitions for CEOs.During the quarter ended 30 September, the company completed the integration and rebranding activities associated with the acquired Lifestyle Family Fitness facilities. Additionally, Life Time expanded plans in connection with its previously announced acquisition of the Atlanta-based Racquet Club of the South by incorporating enhanced fitness and nutrition programs, services and membership opportunities as part of the overall renovation of the tennis complex.www.CommitmentDay.comwww.lifetimefitness.comlast_img read more

American consumers mostly bank on profits, not the ethics of saving

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr But growing values-based sector hopes to woo customers with environmentally and socially sound business practicesby. Natasja SheriffVince Siciliano, head of California-based New Resource Bank, has what he thinks is an abrupt question for people asking about his business and where they might put their hard-earned savings.“Do you know where your money spends the night?” he asked. “They haven’t thought about that, and I tell them it’s not in a mattress and I assure you it’s not in a vault either. It’s out there somewhere in the world, doing something.”That “something” might not just be traditional activities either, such as home and small-business loans. According to the bank watchdog BankTrack, the largest U.S. banks are funding a host of controversial activities, from rainforest removal in Indonesia to speculation on global food prices and the manufacture of cluster bombs — banned by 84 state signatories to the Convention on Cluster Munitions.None of that is surprising news, of course. But in Europe and other places, some consumers are pushing back against the large banks and their lending practices. Banks have sprung up to offer “ethical” services, like Netherlands-based Triodos, with branches all over Europe, and the Canadian Vancity. These banks operate on a set of so-called ethical principles, defined in terms of the social and environmental well-being of the communities they serve.But in the United States, the “ethical” banking movement has been slow to take hold, and the concept of “banking ethics” is more likely to trigger associations with the reckless behavior of bankers than the environmental and social impacts of finance and investment.“Ethical banking? It sounds like an oxymoron, because the nature of capitalism is such that you can’t really be ethical,” said Alex Kapelman, who recently switched banks to avoid ATM fees, but not to ensure that his money is used only in an acceptable way. “I mean, the whole point is to just focus on making as much money for yourself as possible,” he added. continue reading »last_img read more

Members sought for criminal jury instruction panel

first_img Members sought for criminal jury instruction panel The Committee on Standard Jury Instructions in Criminal Cases is now accepting applications.The committee is charged with updating the criminal jury instructions based on changes made to Florida law or opinions issued by the Florida or U.S. Supreme Court. All appointments are made by the chief justice. The term of membership begins January 1. The expiration dates for the members will be staggered in order to avoid a majority turnover in any one year. The committee meets at least four times per year in Tampa.Any lawyer licensed to practice law in Florida and any member of the Florida judiciary may apply for appointment. An application form for membership can be found at www.floridasupremecourt.org/jury_instructions/instructions.shtml.All interested parties are requested to submit a cover letter along with the application to Judge Terry D. Terrell, chair, Committee on Standard Jury Instructions in Criminal Cases, c/o Les Garringer, Office of the State Courts Administrator, 500 S. Duval Street, Tallahassee 32399-1900. The deadline for submitting the application is Friday, December 1. November 1, 2006 Regular News Members sought for criminal jury instruction panellast_img read more

National study finds lower depression, better mental health during the Great Recession

first_imgShare on Twitter Share on Facebook Share Pinterest Emailcenter_img LinkedIn Men and women in the U.S. had lower odds of depression diagnoses and better mental health during the Great Recession of 2007-09 compared to pre-recession according to a University of Maryland (UMD) study published in the journal PLOS ONE. Post-recession, however, women were more likely to be diagnosed with anxiety disorders, while men were less likely to suffer from psychological distress, as measured by a standard test called Kessler 6–post-recession compared to pre-recession. Led by Dr. Rada K. Dagher, assistant professor of health services administration in the UMD School of Public Health, this large, national study is the first in the U.S. known to examine the association between the Great Recession and mental health at the population level.“Research has consistently found that women are twice as likely to have an anxiety disorder than men and these gender differences may have persisted throughout the recession and the post-recession period,” Dr. Dagher said. “Interestingly, our study found that women who lived in the Northeast or the Midwest, were unemployed, or had low household income were most likely to have higher rates of anxiety diagnoses. This information could help policymakers craft targeted responses to future economic downturns.”The research team, which included co-authors Jie Chen, assistant professor, and Stephen B. Thomas, professor, also in the Department of Health Services Administration, stated that past research on the effect of macroeconomic conditions on mental health have yielded mixed findings, although they did not predict that the recession would bring lower depression diagnoses and better mental health for men and women. “Future research should investigate whether the decreased rate of depression diagnoses and better mental health among men and women stems from decreased mental healthcare utilization or increased social support and time for recreational activities,” Dr. Dagher said. The study notes that annual spending on mental healthcare by private health insurance was around 7 percent in 2004-07, but decreased to 2.1 percent during 2007-09 in the U.S.The study utilized 2005-2006, 2008-2009, and 2010-2011 data on 81,313 adults, aged 18 to 64 years old, from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) to designate the pre-recession, during recession, and post-recession periods. The MEPS is a nationally representative survey of the U.S. civilian population. The authors studied the association of the recession with five mental health measures: depression diagnoses, anxiety diagnoses, self-reported mental health, the 12-item Short Form Mental Health Summary (SF-12 MCS) measure, and the Kessler 6 (K6) scale of non-specific psychological distress.The analyses showed consistent findings in regards to lower depression diagnoses and better mental health during the recession across the four different regions of the U.S., and by employment status, income, and health care utilization. After the recession, both men and women identified as “non-users” of health services for anxiety or depression diagnoses had worse mental health compared to pre-recession. These findings highlight certain vulnerable groups, such as unemployed and low income women and non-users of health services, whom policymakers should take into consideration when designing economic and social policies to address economic downturns. The Affordable Care Act might help these disadvantaged groups that have no access to health services through its mandates for state-insurance exchanges to have a base-level package that includes mental health coverage and for insurers to cover depression screening for free, as well as expansions of eligibility in Medicaid programs.The findings of lower odds of depression diagnoses for males and females during the recession may signify decreased visits to mental health providers. A previous study by the authors showed that physician visits for treatment of anxiety or depression significantly decreased during the Great Recession. However, given also the findings of better mental health during the recession for both genders, an alternative explanation could be that during economic downturns people have more leisure time to spend on family, friends and exercise. The passage of the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 may have facilitated access to mental health care in a timely fashion which might have prevented serious mental illnesses. Future studies should research these potential explanations and ascertain which one is at work, using state-specific unemployment rates.last_img read more

Study suggests bipolar disorder has genetic links to autism

first_imgShare Within the last decade, advances in human genome studies have helped uncover several so-called common variations, but none of these variations alone have a large effect. Even more recently, the advent of rapid and relatively cheap next-generation gene sequencing technology has provided an opportunity to find rare variations that might individually have a large effect.“Common variations are thought to each individually have only a tiny impact – for example, increasing a person’s likelihood of getting a disease by 10 to 20 percent,” says James Potash, MD, UI professor and DEO of psychiatry, and senior author of the new study. “The hope with rare variations is that they individually have a much bigger impact, like doubling or quadrupling risk for disease.”Potash and his colleagues devised a two-pronged strategy, combining a case-control approach with family-based exome sequencing to maximize their chances of identifying rare variants that contribute to BD.The idea behind the case-control approach is simple: if a genetic variant is found more often in the group of individuals who have the disease compared to a control group of people without the condition, then the gene variation might be associated with increasing susceptibility to the disease. Very large datasets are key to the success of this approach.Exome sequencing of families affected by a disease is more sophisticated. Comparing exome sequences of related individuals, affected and unaffected by BD, can distinguish variants that “travel with” or segregate with the disease. This approach has long been used to identify gene variants or mutations that are passed from parents to children that cause disease.Overall the family study identified 84 rare variants (in 82 genes) that segregated with BD and that were also predicted to be damaging to the proteins encoded by those genes. The team then tested the likelihood that these rare variations might be involved in causing BD by looking for them in three large case-control datasets that included genome sequences from a total of 3,541 individuals with BD and 4,774 control patients.Despite the relatively large size of the combined datasets, the approach was not powerful enough to identify any of the individual rare variants as definitively associated with BD. However, 19 genes stood out as being over-represented in BD cases compared to controls.“The results were not strong enough for us to say ‘we have pinpointed the genetic culprits.’ But it was strong enough for us to remain interested in these genes as potential contributors to bipolar disorder,” says Potash, who also is the Paul W. Penningroth Professor and Chair of Psychiatry and a member of the Pappajohn Biomedical Institute at the UI.However, when the team considered the 19 genes as a group, they realized that several were also members of groups of genes that had been implicated in autism and schizophrenia.“It turned out that the schizophrenia and the autism genes were all more represented among our 82 genes than you would expect by chance,” Potash says. “And when we looked at our whittled down group of 19 genes, the autism genes continued to be unexpectedly prominent among them.“With studies like this we are finally, after decades of effort, making real progress in nailing down groups of genes and variations in them that play a role in causing bipolar disorder,” Potash adds. “The mechanistic insights we gain from identifying associated genes we hope will point us in the direction of developing new treatments to make a difference for the many people affected by this illness. LinkedIn Share on Twitter Pinterestcenter_img Email Share on Facebook A new study suggests there may be an overlap between rare genetic variations linked to bipolar disorder (BD) and those implicated in schizophrenia and autism.The study, by researchers at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and published recently in JAMA Psychiatry, adds to the growing understanding that many psychiatric diseases share genetic roots, but is among the first to suggest a genetic overlap between bipolar disorder and autism.Bipolar disorder is one of the most important psychiatric illnesses because it is fairly common – affecting between 1 and 3 percent of the population – and quite debilitating. Although many patients are helped by treatments, such as lithium, about one third of people affected by BD do not do well with current therapies. Although it’s long been known that bipolar disorder is highly heritable, identifying specific genetic variants that contribute to the illness has proven difficult.last_img read more

Governor Appoints Enterprise Bank Los Alamos Market President Liddie Martinez To NM Economic Recovery Council

first_imgLiddie MartinezBy CAROL A. CLARKLos Alamos Daily Postcaclark@ladailypost.comDuring her weekly briefing this afternoon, New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham announced her creation of a New Mexico Economic Recovery Council to begin planning for the state’s recovery from the COVID-19 public health crisis. The governor appointed Enterprise Bank & Trust Los Alamos Market President Liddie Martinez along with a diverse group of business and labor leaders from across New Mexico to the 15 person council.“It is such an honor. I know some of the other board members and have had the privilege of serving with Co-Chair Brian Moore on the Think New Mexico Board,” Martinez told the Los Alamos Daily Post this afternoon. “He is an accomplished leader and an amazing advocate for New Mexicans.”The governor said the council will advise her on strategies for gradually reopening New Mexico businesses in a smart, safe and effective manner and for helping New Mexico’s economy to grow and thrive as it emerges from the current public health emergency.The 15 members of the council represent a broad swath of New Mexico’s business community, including leaders from the state’s high-tech industries, tourism and hospitality, film, construction, energy, agriculture and locally based retail.“I know how hard this has been on everybody. New Mexicans’ resilience is being tested now more than ever, but we will come out of this with the resolve we need to heal and thrive again,” Gov. Lujan Grisham said. “If we’re smart and patient about how we move forward, New Mexicans can show the rest of the country how it’s done.”The governor said the advisory council’s discussions must be grounded in science, data, and sound public health research, with regular input from the state’s public health authorities and the Medical Advisory Team. Reopening will happen in phases, beginning with a preparation phase now under way. Once it is deemed safe to do so and safe-operating procedures are in place, some non-essential businesses will be allowed to open alongside those already permitted to operate under the current stay-at-home order. All businesses will need to employ COVID-safe practices appropriate to their specific industry and work environment so that employees and customers can be confident about safely returning to work or patronizing a business.  As New Mexico’s economy reopens, social distancing and COVID-safe practices will be paramount in order to mitigate the risk of a second surge of infections.Brian Moore, co-owner of the Ranch Market in Clayton, and Christina Campos, administrator of Guadalupe County Hospital in Santa Rosa, will co-chair the Council.The following is the complete roster of the Economic Advisory Council.Brian Moore, co-owner Ranch Market, Clayton. Moore is a small businessman from Clayton, where he and his wife own Clayton Ranch Market. Brian was a member of the New Mexico House of Representatives from 2001–2008, where he served on the Legislative Finance Committee. Christina Campos, administrator, Guadalupe Regional Hospital, Santa Rosa. Campos started at the hospital as volunteer and has been serving as administrator since 2004. She is past chairman of the New Mexico Hospital Association Board of Directors and chairman of the NMHA’s Protecting Access to Rural Communities committee. She is a founding member and past chairman of the NM Rural Hospital Network. In 2013, she was appointed by Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius to serve on the National Advisory Committee for Rural Health and Human Services. Campos has a BA in Latin American Studies and Economics from the University of New Mexico and an MBA in Health Care Administration from Regis University in Denver.Jason Harrington, CEO HB Construction. Harrington has 26 years in the architecture/engineering and construction industry. He has served as CEO of HB since 2005, overseeing more than $1 billion in commercial projects across the Southwest. He also has been involved in philanthropic and economic development organizations, including Albuquerque Economic Development, the Albuquerque Community Foundation, the United Way of Central New Mexico and other groups. He holds a BS in Construction Management from the University of New Mexico School of Engineering.Brian O’Leary, senior vice president, tax counsel, NBC/Universal Albuquerque. O’Leary has been tax counsel to NBCUniversal since 1999. O’Leary’s practice focuses on tax controversies, tax policy and economic development initiatives. He is a frequent lecturer on film finance and tax matters and serves as a board member of the National Multistate Tax Symposium. O’Leary regularly assists government authorities in evaluating policy initiatives and appears as a witness before legislative tax and economic development committee hearings.Peter Trevisani, president/CEO, New Mexico United, Santa Fe. Trevisani is the first president, CEO and majority owner of the New Mexico United Soccer team and a former partner in Thornburg Investment Management. Trevisani was an early investor and adviser to the Meow Wolf art collective. He sees New Mexico United as a vehicle for community engagement and catalyst for systemic change. Trevisani is a graduate of Boston College and Columbia University.Sally Stahmann-Solis, CEO, Stahmann Farms, Las Cruces.  Stahmann-Solis is the third-generation Stahmann family CEO of Stahmanns Inc.  She was raised on the family pecan farm in the Mesilla Valley and began working at Stahmanns when she was 9 years old in the company’s mercantile store. She managed the company candy factory after graduating from college and was handed the reigns from her father, William John Stahmann, in 2002. Stahmann-Solis has since become one of the world’s leading female pecan growers and pecan businesswomen. She has a degree in Industrial Engineering from New Mexico State University. Liddie Martinez, Enterprise Bank & Trust, Los Alamos. Martinez, born and raised in Española, is president of the Los Alamos Region and director of Community Engagement for the bank. She previously worked for the security subcontractor to Los Alamos National Laboratory as the director of Community & Economic Development and Government Relations.  For near 20 years, Martinez led the philanthropic programming and investment in the areas of education and economic development and directed wide-spread support of regional non-profit organizations that supported the social fabric of many rural communities across the seven northern counties of New Mexico.Jason Sandel, executive vice president, Aztec Well Family of Companies, Aztec. Sandel, a native of Farmington, is the third generation of his family to help lead a business that includes five oil and gas contractors and associated vertically integrated businesses, which have operated in New Mexico since 1963. Sandel also has served on the Farmington City Council, as chairman of the New Mexico Oil and Gas Association, vice-chair of the New Mexico Medical Insurance Pool, vice-chair of the New Mexico Health Insurance Exchange and as member of the New Mexico Economic Development Commission.  He currently serves on the board of NMOGA and is a member of the New Mexico Methane Advisory Panel. Sandel is a graduate of the University of New Mexico.Allen Affeldt, Historic Plaza Hotel, Las Vegas. Affeldt is a hospitality entrepreneur and philanthropist. In New Mexico, he has recently restored and reopened the Plaza and Castañeda Hotels in Las Vegas and the Legal Tender in Lamy. He serves on many boards, including El Rancho de Las Golondrinas and United World College.Mark Fidel, co-founder, RiskSense Albuquerque. Fidel is responsible for advocating and growing the cybersecurity company’s client portfolio nationwide, specifically in the state, local and education markets.  A native of Grants, Fidel is also a licensed New Mexico attorney with more than 18 years’ experience in law and litigation. He has a Finance Degree from New Mexico State University, an Executive MBA from UNM and a law degree from the University of Denver – Sturm College of Law.Staale Gjervik, president, XTO Energy, Carlsbad. Gjervik, a native of Norway, served with the Norwegian Navy prior to joining Esso Norway in 1998. He has held technical, planning, operations and leadership positions for Exxon Mobil in various locations around the world. He joined XTO in January 2018 as senior vice president focusing on the long-term development of the corporation’s Permian Basin assets. He earned his degree in naval architecture and marine technology from the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland.Vince Alvarado, president, New Mexico Federation of Labor/AFL-CIO, Albuquerque. Alvarado, a third-generation union sheet metal worker from El Paso, Texas, is also business manager of SMART Local 49. He has served on several state committees, including the New Mexico Construction Industries Commission, NM Workforce Development Board and the NM Legislative Council State Jobs Council.Phoebe Suina, owner, High Water Mark, Cochiti Pueblo. Suina manages emergency and disaster assistance projects for High Water, including multi-million-dollar projects for the Federal Emergency Management Agency. She previously has worked for the U.S. Department of Energy and Los Alamos National Laboratory, where she led environmental compliance and remediation efforts, and at the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. Suina has bachelor’s degrees in environmental engineering and engineering sciences and a graduate degree in engineering management, all from the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College. She is from the Pueblos of San Felipe and Cochiti and is active in the traditional cultures of both.Carri Phillis, founder The Salt Yard, Effex Nightclub, Albuquerque. Phillis is a local businesswoman, entrepreneur, and philanthropist. She is the founder of Effex NightClub and The Salt Yard. As a female entrepreneur starting her first business in the middle of the 2008 recession, Phillis says she has mastered the ability to respond then adapt to “every wild turn the journey of entrepreneurship takes you on.” She says that most of her notable successes have roots in rejection and downturns and that sheer determination is what has kept her going. She has never seen any other option than succeeding.Jeremy Turner, director of New Mexico Project Development, Pattern Energy.  Prior to joining Pattern, Turner was a managing partner with Forever Energy Consulting LLC, the executive director of the New Mexico Renewable Energy Transmission Authority and the chief financial adviser for the New Mexico Finance Authority.  Turner has 10 years of experience in the electric transmission industry and 20 years managing and structuring complex public and private financial transactions.  He holds an MBA and Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics from New Mexico State University.last_img read more

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